Australia uses the military to enforce a restraining order

Australia uses the military to enforce a restraining order

Despite a sharp increase in Covid 19 cases, the Australian Army sent 300 soldiers on patrol in Sydney as many ignored the restraining order.

300 unarmed soldiers will coordinate with New South Wales State Police to enforce a siege order in Sydney and surrounding areas from August 2. They will inspect homes and restrict going out to ensure residents comply with home stay rules.

“We need the military’s support in enforcing the restrictions because a small percentage of residents think the rules do not apply to them,” said New South Wales Police Chief David Elliott.

Police patrol the streets of Sydney, Australia on July 30. Photo: AFP.

In the middle of the week Sydney authorities extended the siege order, which lasted until August 28, as the Covid 19 cases continued to escalate. Despite strict restrictions, 170 isolated cases involving one person infected with the virus have been reported in the state of New South Wales.

Under the improved lockout, non-essential shops in Sydney and its suburbs have been hit hard by the explosion. Residents are not allowed to leave the residential area until they are working in an emergency or medical force. Construction sites have been suspended in Sydney.

A strict travel restriction order was introduced in mid-July in Sydney, the state capital of New South Wales.

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison has also been heavily criticized for the slow pace of the vaccine, when only 14% of Australians received the Covit-19 vaccine.

“No country is 100% responsive to the epidemic,” Prime Minister Morrison said on July 28. He also announced that fully vaccinated people could bypass some restrictions when the national vaccination rate reaches 70%, while large-scale siege orders in large cities will end when the vaccination rate reaches 70%. The vaccine reached 80%.

See also  Malaysian PM prepares to resign tomorrow

Injection program Covit-19 vaccine In Australia, there is a “painful” delay and the rapidly spreading delta mutation threatens Australia’s “Covit Zero” campaign, thanks to border closures from March 2020. There have been 33,909 infections and 923 deaths reported in Australia so far.

Wu An (Follow ABC News)

You May Also Like

About the Author: Will Smith

Alfred Lee covers public and private tech markets from New York. He was previously a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Economics and Business Journalism at Columbia University, and prior to that was a reporter at the Los Angeles Business Journal. He has received a Journalist of the Year award from the L.A. Press Club and an investigative reporting award from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *