Newborn in Israel with a fetus in the womb: A Rare Scientific News | Malayalam Technology News

newborn-baby

One of the pioneers in science took place at the Ashuda Medical Center Hospital in Ashdod, Israel. A woman was born here with a fetus in her womb. Doctors say it is a condition that affects one in five million people in the world.

Earlier, doctors noticed that the baby’s abdomen was too large to scan the mother during pregnancy. But it was not clear at the time what was going on. After delivery, doctors perform a detailed examination of the baby and an ultrasound scan to determine if there is a fetus in the abdomen.

The baby was then taken to the operating theater and the fetus was removed after surgery. Doctors say the fetus was half-developed. Hospital officials said the mother and baby were discharged home after surgery.

There are many theories and theories in medicine as to why this happens. The strong theory is that this is because the embryos that form twins absorb each other. There will be holes in the absorbed nucleus. This is where the other embryo enters. It will grow somewhat within it but will not reach full growth. The brain does not develop. Absorbed embryos die before delivery.

In 2018, a similar incident took place in India. A similar fetus was found in a baby girl named Prinza, who was born at the Azharwa Civil Hospital in Ahmedabad. But it is more complicated than Israel. However, doctors surgically removed the fetus and the baby recovered.

English abbreviation: one in half a million: a woman born in Israel with twins in her womb

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About the Author: Seth Sale

Seth Sale is an all-around geek who loves learning new stuff every day. With a background in Journalism and a passion for web-based technologies and Gadgets, she focuses on writing about on Hot Topics, Web Trends, Smartphones, and Tablets.

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