A jar of Lorraine jam discovered by archaeologists in Texas

A jar of Lorraine jam discovered by archaeologists in Texas

An American archaeologist contacted Bar-Le-Duck’s Tutres and obtained information about a jar of redcurrant jam not found “anywhere in the middle” in Texas. It may have been brought there at the end of the 19th century.

We have no idea how this is a small piece of Lorraine that ended up in Texas. The information was emailed to the Maison Tutres mailbox in Bar-le-Duke (Muse) on July 14th. “An American archaeologist contacted me to find out if the jar he found in Texas actually came from our company.” Annie Tudries, manager of the named mansion, explains. “He wanted to know more about the pot, especially what glassware was put in. This is the first time in twenty years that I have received such a request!”

Well-marked monument

The pieces of glass after 9079 weighed 90 to 100 grams per jar. A jar of Bar-le-Duck’s specially planted redcurrant jam still in use today.

Bar-le-Doug on July 30, 2021. Tatris House “à la Lorraine” only uses traps with Lorraine cross. It was able to accurately identify the appearance of the pot found in Texas.

© Lodos Gravel – France 3 Lorraine

Monsieur Amீble and my grandfather shipped 2,000 jars to the United States every two months, so there were 12,000 jars each year in the United States for more than a century.

Anne Tutres, manager of “A la Lorraine”

After the first e-mail on July 14, American archaeologist Marnie Francel – working Texas Parks and Wildlife From Austin, Texas – sent photos of its invention. It reveals pieces of glass that have no doubt about their appearance as they are engraved on the back of Lorraine’s cross. “We’re the only house in Lorraine to use this scenery at the bottom of the pot.” Anne Tutres explains. “It’s very consistent because Monsieur is friendly (Editor’s note on one of the company’s former managers) My grandfather sent 2,000 jars to the U.S. every two months, so 12,000 jars went to the U.S. every year for more than a century. “

Distinctive knowledge from 1344

Seed Red Currant Jam is a specialty of Bar-le-Duck since 1344, and its mode of production remains unchanged. It’s a game of patience, which involves removing seeds using a quill pen.Caviar from Bar-le-Duck“.

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Today the company that holds this unique knowledge is named “A la Lorraine” Living traditional company Since 2013; Updated label in 2019.

Bar-le-Duck on July 30, 2021, Anne Tutres offers a jam jam similar to the one found in Texas, still used in 90 to 100 gram jars today.

Bar-le-Duck on July 30, 2021, Anne Tutres offers a jam jam similar to the one found in Texas, still used in 90 to 100 gram jars today.

© Lodos Gravel – France 3 Lorraine

Part of Texas history

This archaeological research in Texas may come as a surprise to us French people who have been more accustomed to excavations since very ancient times such as the Ancient Era or the Merovingian period. But for Americans they make sense. “It’s about understanding and getting to know the first settlers of this region of Texas in the late 19th century.” Marnie explained the French to Annie Tutres.

We must not forget that the conquest of the West was largely done during this period, and that although Texas does not necessarily speak of a part of the West it is a frontier. It is known for the subsequent periods when the colonists left some traces from Lorraine.

Bar-le-Doug, July 30, 2021: Two pots similar to the pieces found by archaeologists in Texas.  One on the left, the oldest, is a cork typical of the 1880s, printed on the screen with the name of former manager Monsieur Amebial.

Bar-le-Doug, July 30, 2021: Two pots similar to the pieces found by archaeologists in Texas. One on the left, the oldest, is a cork typical of the 1880s, printed on the screen with the name of former manager Monsieur Amebial.

© Lodos Gravel – France 3 Lorraine

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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