False Acacia, Magnolia grandiflora, Echinacea … a short trip to the United States

False Acacia, Magnolia grandiflora, Echinacea ... a short trip to the United States

False False Acacia

Robinia – Robinia pseudocacia -, one of the first plants to come from the United States, is sometimes well accustomed to invading.If you have space – it needs space – for its scent and its bouquets, you have to accept it.10 to 25 m tall, a hopper with sinful branches that take on the appearance of a parasite over time, very light autumn foliage, failed vitality (it can live up to 300 years!), Here are its main characteristics.

Not to mention that it is growing fast.The large leaves are composed of 3 to 10 pairs of leaflets, with two long spines at their base, most of which are not. They take on beautiful fall colors, gold. When the tree is about ten years old, it will bloom in long clusters of white flowers.Stem straight, gray-brown bark deeply cracked, branches smooth and angular, young reddish brown fluffy branches spiny. All soils apply to him, rich or poor, lime or acid. Place in the sun or in partial shade. Another quality? It will fight pollution.

Good food taster, This is a delicacy above all else: the famous donuts!Flowers and clusters are harvested in May and June.Donuts, syrup, cake, pancakes, fruit salad, green salad … Flowers lend themselves to a thousand recipes. For some, like salads or syrup, the flowers are separated, while for donuts, the whole bunch is placed, which is dipped in flour. It gives fun shapes. I like to sprinkle these flowers on strawberries, for an elegant, cheerful and delicious dessert: the two flavors combine wonderfully.

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AC procedure. Let’s go to Chile … stay in the heart of the garden

Horticultural varieties, for small gardens

These small varieties are small between 5-9 m tall, often without thorns. And their flowers are edible. Frisia has beautiful golden green caramel in the fall. Twisty Baby has an umbrella stand with twisted branches and spiral foliage. Forget Ambraculifera: It has a perfect shape, in a ball… but rarely flowers.

Trees Some trees and shrubs from the Atlantic Ocean

The lush, summer-flowering magnolia grandiflora originated in North America in the 18th century.e Century. Hydrangea curcifolia has been a part of our gardens for decades. An Auxiliary Shrub: Lying Winter – Colteria Procompens -, A Beautiful Ground Cover …

Per beautiful American in our perennial beds

What would our summer and autumn gardens be without plants from the great outdoors of North America? Although the North American plains are full of trees and shrubs, we also adopted numerous nematode plants because they bloom longer and are easier to live with. In this region where the southern grasslands and the northern forests meet, the grasslands are blown away by the wind and warmed by the sun, supporting a strong heat wave because the winters are very cold and the summers are very hot, which is why these plants are easy to grow.

Of these American plants, some are well known. Echinaceas, Monardias, Coropsis, Rudbeckias, Asters, Delphinium, Benstemans, Helianthus, Lobilias, Couras, Verbena, Augustocchios, Columbine, Phlox… Not mentioned in large numbers. Less common is Apios americana, also known as Tuperus wisteria, which grows to over 4 m in height. It grows south of Canada. It is most abundant on the clay shores of St. Lawrence because its seeds are carried by the river. Its abundant clusters of flowers turn almost black plum in late summer. It is very easy to grow in the sun.

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Read on. Non-riveting roses are out of bloom: prune them!

Baptisia looks like a blue or white lupine. Native to eastern (Kentucky, Georgia, Missouri) and eastern Canada is the Guilliana tripholiota, a white, dark red calyx that blooms in numerous and light galaxies. Allium amplectens “Graceful Beauty”, native to the West, is an ornamental garlic that bears beautiful dense flowers and is pearly white in June-July. Easy to grow in any good soil and sun.

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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