Amazon is developing its own Chloe Radar to monitor your sleep

amazon echo show

According to the latest certification from the American frequency company FCC, Amazon can equip its next Echo Show speaker with a radar, which takes the opinion of Google’s Chloe Gesture Inventor. This technology will allow the device to monitor your sleep.

Credit: Amazon

Remember, in 2019, Google is introducing the Google Pixel 4. Mountain View’s new flagship thanks to the presence of one technology in particular from the competition: Chloe Radar. In short, this chip emits radio waves ”Scanner ” Surrounding items like your hand. In fact, sensor gestures can detect gestures, which are then converted into commands directly on the device.

A promising technology, but considered too expensive to integrate with the Google Pixel 5. However, Chloe Radar launched this year in March 2021 on Google’s latest Nest Hub. Here the attached speaker allows you to control it with gestures, but also provides a function Sleep monitoring Especially by analyzing your body’s movements and your breathing.

Amazon works on its own Chloe radar

However, the latest certification from the US National Frequency Agency, the FCC. Amazon is currently working on a similar technology. According to the documents, the company allowed Amazon to use “radar sensors” on unnamed devices to allow unrelated checks.By capturing movement in three-dimensional space ”.

You will agree, This description is very reminiscent of Google’s Chloe Radar. In addition, the FCC file states that these radar sensors can be used to upgrade “Awareness and management of sleep hygiene ”. As mentioned above, no device is directly quoted, but it is mentioned that Amazon can use this technology on non-mobile devices.

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In other words, New Amazon Echo Show, The next attached screen of the American company, seems to be the perfect candidate to accommodate this technology. “The ability to recognize users’ non-contact gestures to control a device may help people with motor, speech, or tactile disabilities, which may increase the productivity and quality of life of many American users. ” Amazon writes.

Source: Android Central

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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