The Supreme Court of Brazil confirms that one of the trials against Lula was not impartial

The Supreme Court of Brazil confirms that one of the trials against Lula was not impartial

Lula da Silva. Photo: AFP / Archive

The Supreme Court of Brazil concluded a process this Wednesday in which it reaffirmed Former President Sergio Moro has not acted “impartially” in one of the trials against former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva.

This decision, adopted by four by seven votes, confirms the judgment given by the second chamber of the Supreme Court, which has already ruled on the suspicion. Moro, then Minister of Justice in the Jair Bolsanaro government, did not act “impartially” In the trial against Lula.

This verdict is limited to the verdict on an apartment on a beach, Lula would have received a bribe Contracts with public organizations are said to “help” some private companies.

For that matter, another test, directed by Morrow at the time, The former president was sentenced to nearly 26 years in prison and 580 days in prison.

However, in an earlier sentence adopted last April, the Supreme Court itself quashed the absence of those two trials and two other charges, after recognizing that the power struggle should have prevented Moro from taking responsibility for those processes.

According to the court, the cases against Lula were not related to the corruption in the state-owned Petrobras, so they were outside the jurisdiction of the Guerrero court, which was later in charge of Moro and was limited to reasons related to the oil company.

It was decided by the Supreme Court All four trials are set to reopen in Brazilian courts. But with the sentence handed down this Wednesday, in the case of the beach apartment, all the evidence Morrow had analyzed at the time was null and void and could not be used by the court which resumed the process.

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The abolition of the sentences against Lula restored all political rights of the former president, He is poised to run for president in October next year.

Lula has not fully confirmed that he wants to return to power, but has bluntly stated that he will do so “if necessary”. He will oust his biggest rival in national politics, the far-right Jair Bolsanaro, and seek re-election in 2022.

With more than a year to go before Brazilians return to the polls, the polls so far have already made Lula a clear choice., Since taking office on January 1, 2011, has been in office for more than 70% of the approval rating after eight years in office.

(With information from EFE)

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About the Author: Will Smith

Alfred Lee covers public and private tech markets from New York. He was previously a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Economics and Business Journalism at Columbia University, and prior to that was a reporter at the Los Angeles Business Journal. He has received a Journalist of the Year award from the L.A. Press Club and an investigative reporting award from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

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