Classic Space Telescope Hubble Offline – After an unknown error

Classic Space Telescope Hubble Offline - After an unknown error

One of Hubble’s computers has stopped working. If technicians do not find the cause of the error, they may need to run a backup.

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has been exploring the universe since the 1990s. It orbits at a distance of about 600 km from the Earth, outside our atmosphere, so it is able to take sharper images than land-based telescopes. Thanks to this, Hubble has contributed a wealth of new knowledge about the solar system, the Milky Way and distant galaxies.

But on Sunday, June 13 this year, one of the space telescope’s computers suddenly stopped working. Tells NASA.

The task of the computer in question is to control and integrate Hubble’s scientific tools. NASA tried to fix it by running tests and collecting information about the computer. But technicians have yet to find the cause of the problem. Therefore, scientific instruments are now in a safe state.

read more: James Webb Telescope sees the beginning of time

An initial theory is that the error was exacerbated due to a memory block. So the technicians tried to strike on a reserve, without success. Attempts to link memory modules also failed.

Hubble “in good health”

Both Hubble and scientific instruments must be “in good health,” the space agency said. If the technicians are not successful in repairing the current system, you should run a backup, which is in orbit.

Hubble is designed to be repaired and upgraded, but NASA has previously said that it is Can no longer be repaired or upgraded.

At the end of 2021, NASA will launch a new and powerful telescope called the James Webb. The new space telescope can see through clouds and dust in space and be with others Read how galaxies form And the birth of stars and planets.

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About the Author: Cary Douglas

Cary Douglas is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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