In London, the Notting Hill Festival was canceled for the second time due to variation

Le carnaval de Notting Hill, ici en 2019, est habituellement l

The organizers of the event, which was supposed to celebrate Caribbean culture at the end of August, are inviting “Uncertainty” Associated with the rapid spread of delta strain.

The festival has been canceled again in Notting Hill, London, which traditionally celebrates Caribbean culture in late August, organizers highlighted on Friday.“Uncertainty” Linked to the eruption of delta variation in the UK. With lively floats, thunder orchestras, colorful feather helmets and rhinestone bikinis, the festival in this district of west London is generally one of the most important in Europe.

Like last year, the festival’s board of directors announced in a press release that it will “not take to the streets this year due to permanent uncertainty and the risk of Covid 19.”

This “Incredibly difficult decision” Facing the spread of the delta variant initially detected in India to the UK, the government is following a Monday to postpone it for at least four weeks.

The United Kingdom, one of the most affected countries in Europe with nearly 128,000 deaths, saw its health improve significantly in the spring, thanks to longer imprisonment and a more effective vaccination campaign.

11,000 new cases daily

But the country is now making significant progress in pollution, with more than 11,000 new cases detected in 24 hours on Thursday, the first since February. “With so much uncertainty, short time to prepare and the risk of possible cancellation being a real possibility, we need to focus on our efforts for 2021.”, Explained to the organizers, explaining how to prepare a plan of events according to the health situation.

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Last year, the festival was held only in the digital version and aired on four TV channels. Burning for three days on the streets of Notting Hill, the event usually brings together two million people, making it the second festival in the world after Rio, Brazil.

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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