How can Jupiter be the largest moon from a short distance. NASA has released new images sent by the Juno spacecraft

How can Jupiter be the largest moon from a short distance.  NASA has released new images sent by the Juno spacecraft

NASA’s Juno spacecraft has provided the first images of Jupiter’s largest satellite from short distances over the past two decades. Juno passed Jupiter’s frozen satellite Canmeit 1,038 kilometers on Monday.

The last space exploration was in 2000, when NASA’s Galileo passed the largest moon in our solar system.

Published by NASA Two images captured by Juno on Tuesday show ganmeet grooves and long and short shapes that may be related to tectonic plates. In one image you can see the distant part of the natural satellite facing the sun.

Juno passed over Jupiter’s frozen satellite Canmeet on Monday. Photo: NASA
Juno passed over Jupiter's frozen satellite Canmeet on Monday
Juno passed over Jupiter’s frozen satellite Canmeet on Monday. Photo: NASA

Scott Bolton, chief analyst at the Juno project at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, said: “There has been no space exploration of this last-generation moon.

“We will allow time to make scientific decisions, but until then we can marvel at this celestial wonder – a moon larger than Mercury in our solar system,” Bolton added.

Conmeet is one of 79 known moons orbiting the gas company Jupiter.

The Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei discovered Canymete in 1610, along with Jupiter’s following three large natural satellites.

Launched over a decade ago, the unmanned Juno spacecraft has been orbiting Jupiter for five years.

Juno will send several images taken as it passes through Canmeet in the coming days, and EFE notes that the encounter with Jovian Moon may provide information about its composition, ionosphere, magnetic field, and ice. At the same time, scientists estimate that data on radiation levels could be obtained, which could be used by future trips to the Jovian system.

See also  Earth is about to capture a new "mini moon" (but it should not be a moon)

The Juno probe, the size of a basketball court, was the first to be designed to run on the center of Jupiter’s radiation belt, reaching a distance of 2,575 kilometers from the top layer of its clouds.

Also read: Photo Gallery How bright clouds look on Mars. Images sent by Curiosity Rover

Author: A.A.

You May Also Like

About the Author: Cary Douglas

Cary Douglas is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *