“Not just a celebration of nature”

"Not just a celebration of nature"

A digital tablet, brushes to use an app created specifically for him, these tools and it was in his garden that David Hogney painted his Normandy. One thing that was before his eyes, was nature. The project was planned before epidemics and locks. But the odd year that has now passed gives a certain echo to his works.

The world’s most expensive painter is celebrating the region with the first exhibition on Sunday, May 23 under the Gold of the Royal Academy in central London. Of the 116 works painted on the iPod during his first imprisonment a year ago, in this series David Hockney was later isolated and baptized at his Norman home in Pace de Agile. The arrival of spring. Edith Devane, the museum’s supervisor, gradually followed suit. “What David did brought us to Normandy,” She explains. It’s not just a celebration of nature, it’s a lot of Normandy landscapes … “

“It’s an adaptation of the origin of a kind of Impressionism. Here a British artist loves Impressionists, he paints in the open, and you see its value.”

God damn it

to franceinfo

Weeping willow, pear tree, fig tree நாம் We see that even these bare and sad trees take on color. Hockney’s garden illuminates at sunrise, sunset, broad daylight or night. Norman influence was not limited to the landscape.

Edith Devane, Superintendent of the Museum.  (Richard Place / Radio France)

“He was very interested in Bayox tape, poursuit Edith Devane. When the museum opened, he visited her several times. He found it so unusual! This is a story, a story, She explains. In a certain way, Concludes the Museum Superintendent, I think it affected the body of the work he created, because it’s really a story. In the first room, we see trees starting to form in the winter and then ending with the spring at its peak. “

The painter who took refuge in Normandy, in a happy prison facing an enchantment, is well aware of the sufferings of his contemporaries. His message with this exhibition is simple: nothing can stop the spring.

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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