More than 45,000 candidates to kill 12 barbarians in Grand Canyon National Park

More than 45,000 candidates to kill 12 barbarians in Grand Canyon National Park

The initiative, launched by the National Park Service, aims to regulate the number of barbarians in the park.

More than 45,000 people have volunteered at Grand Canyon National Park in the United States as part of an unprecedented plan to regulate the animal’s growing population, the National Park Service (NPS) announced Friday. Responsible for managing large landscapes in the United States.

Bison, NPS spokeswoman Caitlin Thomas said the “ecosystem” would “reduce the size of the herd” and “protect” the park’s water resources, plants and soil, if they were in abundance, and threaten archaeological sites.

In response to this problem, officials at Grand Canyon Park in Arizona began calling for applications in early May to find twelve volunteers willing to take part in the event.

25 finalists were drawn

Of the 45,000 applications received in two days, 25 finalists will be drawn and twelve will be selected by May 17. Each of them would be given the power to kill a savage, after which he would “be able to leave the area as a beast without the assistance of a motor vehicle”, the use of which is not recognized in the area. This area, says the National Park Service.

To be eligible to participate, volunteers must be prominent U.S. citizens, be in “excellent physical condition”, have their own rifle, be trained and “have strong verbal communication skills”, NBS continued.

The carcasses of the animals will be distributed among the participants, within the limits of “a barbarism for a group of volunteers,” Caitlin Thomas notes.

The initiative was a huge success, but it came as no surprise to the spokesman, who suspected it would “generate a lot of interest”. “When the program was launched, hundreds of emails and calls to the park were asked for additional information on how it was recorded,” he says.

This is not a hunt, according to NBS, the activity is controlled by park officials and is not conducted for recreational or private purposes.

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Since 2019, the park has also been capturing wildlife to move to other areas. The 400-600 wildebeest are currently believed to inhabit the northern part of the Grand Canyon Park. In ten years, experts estimate that their population will triple and reach 1,500 animals. Such a plan is unprecedented in the Grand Canyon, but according to Caitlin Thomas, similar measures have been taken in other national parks to combat “large populations of elk or sheep.”

Melanie Rostagnot with AFP PFMTV Reporter

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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