What if France, like Australia, chooses a “Zero Covid” strategy?

What if France, like Australia, chooses a "Zero Covid" strategy?
Interview

In his book Kovit, masked ball – who led the dance? The story and lessons of a planetary crisis, Antoine Flaholt, epidemiologist and director of the Geneva Institute of Global Health, draws one-year epidemiological lessons using international comparisons and portraits. Patrick Cohen, guest on Wednesday at Europe Midi, suggested that France should be inspired by countries like Australia and New Zealand, which are the champions of this health crisis, by using the zero strategy. Govt.

“I will not allow myself to judge the political decisions of one or the other in Europe. But at this time, when we are not in a period of rapid rapid growth of the virus, we can bring different elements or different possible strategies in general. Debate. Even in a democratic debate. There are other solutions. “

“Europeans still run behind the curve”

Antoine Flahold took the example of the harsh imprisonment announced by Boris Johnson on January 4th. “In Britain, the British Public Health Organization said that if you continue at this rate, which is at an all-time high, you will not be able to cure English in three weeks. Therefore, he has no choice but to make a decision on strict control.

This professor of the Faculty of Medicine in Geneva proposes the exact opposite with other European scientists. According to him, it will be inspired by more active people than reactions like Asians or Pacific people. These prevent the virus from re-emerging during a recession. It is possible to imagine a virus-free life just like Australia or New Zealand.

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Of course, this sometimes requires drastic measures. “These are three cases in New Zealand and eight cases in Australia,” said Antoine Flauult. But these changes are minimal, “three days and five days, respectively.”

On the other hand, the profit is significant. “You can really make Melbourne envious. Before prison, there were 30,000 undressed spectators in an arena to watch the Australian Open. You can go to bars and restaurants at night, life is so much more, relax.”

As the epidemiologist explains, what these countries are looking for is to suppress the circulation of the virus as much as possible so that they can live in an “almost normal” state. “When you’re on a small island in the middle of the Atlantic or Pacific, we have to admit that it’s easy to implement,” he agrees.

Necessary European advice

“To implement this strategy domestically, it must be agreed upon throughout Europe and very strict health restrictions must be placed on the borders. So we need European consultation before us.” But Antoine Flahold believes nothing is possible. “Ultimately, countries like Germany, Denmark or the Netherlands may prefer the zero Govt strategy precisely because they are coming into the green zone, i.e. falling after tight control.”

A desire to inevitably have consequences for other states. “At that time, if they want to take part in this strategy, they can ask France or Belgium. Otherwise, they can refuse to let the citizens of those countries come. At home without very strong measures.”

Didier Raoult, “Precious Flash” but a character “splitting”

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In his book, Antoine Flaholt also devotes a chapter to Didier Raoult. According to him, Marseille’s medical professor’s “many flashes or stages” were so valuable that they would have been very useful if they had been accepted in France, especially on a large scale. Marcel’s IHU.

Epidemiologist Didier Raoult draws a parallel between Galileo, who firmly believes that both are perfect against the whole earth. “All researchers are like the following research,” recognizes Antoine Flaholt. “But in a moment of excitement it is absolutely necessary to bring up an objective assessment. Sometimes, this objective assessment does not end in your favor, there you have to bow. In my opinion, it works as a scientific process.”

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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