With Timelapse, Google Earth converts Earth into satellite images almost forty years back

With Timelapse, Google Earth converts Earth into satellite images almost forty years back

LThe melting of the Greenland ice, the disappearance of the Amazon rainforest, and Dubai’s urban expansion இணைந்து In collaboration with NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA), Google has created a tool that allows the planet to see more than thirty years of evolution. In 3D. The Google Earth timelapse feature, released online on Thursday, April 15, highlights the impact of climate change since 1984.

The Function, Lists twenty million satellite images, accessible on Google Earth. The American company has compiled the evolution of the planet over the past thirty-seven years into five main themes: forest transformation, fragile beauty, global warming, urban expansion and energy sources.

Changes around the world

Thanks to the Timelapse tool, the Internet user can thus travel the entire world and see that no space is protected by these changes. In North America, the Columbia Glacier is gradually shrinking.

In South America, The big tattoo expands The Amazon rainforest will lead to a brown earth.

The article is reserved for our subscribers Read this too “Amazon rainforests burned by livestock”

Surely Satellite images taken in Utah, In the United States, mines cause damage to mountains annually. Between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, The Aral Sea is drying up Gradually, sand will appear.

In the United Arab Emirates, Dubai is advancing in the sea.

You can access the functionality from the web browser by going directly to Google Earth. Also, to follow the evolution of specific sites, A YouTube playlist Currently offers 290 videos of identity landscapes. Two of them position us in France: one shows Expansion of Toulouse The other shows the construction of the Cestas Solar Power Station near Bordeaux.

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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