4 Week Trend: Weather until May 16th

4 Week Trend: Weather until May 16th

By King GrebondMeteorologist

Every Thursday, the 4 week weather trend is updated. The latter presents a mostly weather show for the next four weeks until May 16th.

The last few weeks have been marked by very large temperature fluctuations with an exceptional early heat episode at the end of March, followed by a remarkably cold episode during the first ten days of this April. Within a week the monthly records of heat and cold were broken with terrible consequences for the agricultural sector. This week, it was snowing almost daily in some areas.

Here is the overall trend expected for the next 4 weeks

Week 1: April 19 to 25

High pressure conditions prevail across the country again with calm weather, but a sun is sometimes saddened by cloudy seasons and there is a risk of rain in the Northeast and reliefs. The good news is the gradual rise in seasonal mild temperatures expected in the afternoons.

Week 2: April 26 to May 2

The high pressure will weaken and the weather will gradually become more unstable from the south, which will have a stormy nature. In the north, the high pressure area may well resist. The temperature will drop by a few degrees. This forecast needs further confirmation.

Week 3: May 3 to 9

This trend is mainly for thunderstorms mixed with thunderstorms on the southwest / northeast axis. The temperature will be close to the seasonal norms.

Week 4: May 10-16

Showers or thundershowers with cloudy weather with very variable weather, dry weather and clearing.

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In the end, The dry weather trend continues next week. As May 1 approaches, rain and storm damage are expected in the southern part of the country. Later, rainfall will be irregular and varied. Temperatures are constantly fluctuating during these seasons.

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Cary Douglas

About the Author: Cary Douglas

Cary Douglas is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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