Hurricane Zero: Australia is preparing for the worst

Seroja et Odette MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA GSFC.jpg

Hurricane Ode and Seroza near the Australian coast. Photo credit: Modis Land Rapid Response Team, NASA GSFC


The devastating system, which killed more than 130 people and caused extensive damage, especially in Indonesia, intensified shortly before arriving in Australia. Hurricane Cerroja, formerly Type 1, was transformed into Type 3 on the Beaufort scale. This is equivalent to Hurricane Force 1 on the scale of Sapphire Simpson used in North America.

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According to Australian Government Meteorological CenterWinds of up to 165 kmph and heavy rain and flash floods are expected. In fact, the city of Calbury recorded 170km / h at 7pm local time, and has received 111mm of rain so far in the west of the country.

Local officials said widespread damage could be expected across the west coast as buildings on Seroja Road were not built to withstand such strong winds. In general, the epicenter of the hurricane in this part of the world is further north of the country.

Fujiwara effect

This gain of strength can be explained especially by the Fujiwara effect. This is a rare weather event that occurs when two hurricanes or tornadoes rotate in the same direction and move closer to each other. The two systems then begin to attract each other, which may alter their respective paths, increase their intensity, or merge. In this case, an encounter with a low-range hurricane, Ode, last Friday led to the event. However, without a merger, Oded allowed Seroja to intensify.

Loss of impending severity

Now residents in the areas between Carnarvon and Perth are expecting worse, with the Australian Government’s Meteorological Office saying Xerox will lose intensity as it moves inland. The organization predicts that the hurricane will return to Type 1 by Monday morning.


See also: Deadly floods and landslides

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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