The mother accused of four times the infanticide that was destroyed by science?

The mother accused of four times the infanticide that was destroyed by science?

Kathleen Folbick was sentenced in 2003 to 30 years in prison for the murder of her four children. Genetic deficiencies have been found in their genes, which justifies the suspicion of natural death. 91 scientists apologize to him.

Between 1989 and 1999, Kathleen Folbick lost four of her children. The youngest is 18 days and the senior is 18 months. They are said to have died of sudden death and epilepsy. In the fourth death, the police conduct an investigation and complete the infanticide four times, even withdrawing the mother’s confession, which then qualifies as the worst “serial killer in Australia”. His sentence was commuted to 40 years in prison in 2003 and reduced to 30 years on appeal.

However, scientific works have established that natural deaths can occur in the form of multiple deaths, even within a single family unit. In 2016, The study was led by researchers at the University of Paris Descartes Goes in this direction. Recent analyzes of victims’ genes have revealed mutations that lead to sudden infant mortality syndrome reports Parisian. That is why 91 international scientists, including two French researchers from Nandes University Hospital, asked for the family’s mother’s grace.

What about the confession?

In 2019, Kathleen Folpick’s attorney realized that justice could not take her writing into account as a confession. According to him, parents who lose children are in a position to “irrationally blame themselves for their actions and shortcomings.”

Australian justice is insensitive to calls for review. That is why scientists are apologizing to the Governor of New South Wales. If she offers it, Kathleen Folfick will be released after serving 18 years in prison, but she will have to go to the New South Wales Criminal Court of Appeals to have her convictions dismissed, said co-author Ronnie Rego and the judges.

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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