Australia: Tiger sharks, these great protectors of underwater grasslands

Australia: Tiger sharks, these great protectors of underwater grasslands

A study released in late February shows that the absence of tiger sharks in the Gulf of Australia exacerbates the damage caused by extreme weather events.

Western Australia, Shark Bay, 2011. An intense ocean heat wave partially destroys one of the world’s largest and richest Seagrass broilers. Biodiversity In this world. Most dugongs (These species are classified as “vulnerable” to “sea cows”) and then left the bay, paving the way for the original field experience.

For 16 months, American and Australian researchers used these damaged areas as scientific laboratories. Knowing the grazing rate of Tukong in its absence Tiger sharks (Galiocerto Quier, Almost threatened), Were able to artificially imitate their behavior and statements Defender.

Trowel-mounted divers reflect the mammalian grazing habits by routinely turning the seagrass, a practical scientists “Underwater Garden”.

Tiger sharks prevent dukongs from exaggerating

“This allowed us to reflect on the behavior of the Dukongs if the sharks in the Gulf magically disappeared, or if they overfished.”The study was published on February 23, 2021 by Robert J. Noviki Journal of Animal Ecology.

They found that the most important cyclone was not recovered because it was often disturbed by “grazing” by divers. In the absence of super predators, not only does the ecosystem degenerate, but the vegetation is proof that any recovery is impossible. In other words: Tiger sharks protect underwater grasslands, thus preventing the Dukongs from becoming overly angry.

“When all is well, we should not realize the importance of super hunters, Analysis Defender Michael Heidas, Marine Biologist at the International University Florida And co-author of an article that has read this berry for two decades. But when things go wrong – like extreme weather events – it’s obvious. “

Also read:

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Whale sharks heal from their wounds at “extraordinary” speeds
Global warming is forcing white sharks to change habitat, endangering local wildlife

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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