A piece from the famous Wright Brothers plane will float to Mars

A piece from the famous Wright Brothers plane will float to Mars

The connection between the first spacecraft to fly to Earth and the first small helicopter scheduled to fly to Mars in the coming weeks: The ingenious helicopter, which was scheduled to fly its first flight to a neighboring planet in a few weeks, was attached to a piece of cloth from the Wright brothers’ plane, which first flew in December 1903 in North Carolina. This was announced by the American Space Agency.

The small helicopter, which arrived on Mars with the “Perseverance” spacecraft, is scheduled to attempt orbit the planet before April 8.

The piece of cloth was transferred to NASA from the base of the left by the Historical Museum in Dayton, Ohio, the city where the Wright brothers grew up.

Documents for the spacecraft landing on Mars lasted

(Photo: NASA)

“Wilbur and Orville Wright departed in 1903 and are pleased to learn that a small portion of the Flyer I aircraft that reached a quarter of a mile is going to make history on Mars,” said Amanda Wright Lane and Stephen Wright. On December 17, 1903, the aircraft created four planes, 279 meters long between them.

It turns out that this is not the first time parts of the Wright Brothers’ historic plane have crossed Earth’s borders. Astronaut Neil Armstrong also carried a cloth to the moon in 1969 during the Apollo 11 mission. 29 years later, John Glenn holds the title of the oldest astronaut in history, part of the 1998 space shuttle Discovery.

The helicopter is nothing more than a small glider, and “in the sky of the planet” must be only five meters high for an airplane to fly at an altitude of 300 meters above the ground and stay in the air for up to one and a half minutes on each plane.

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Cary Douglas

About the Author: Cary Douglas

Cary Douglas is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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