In Latin America, “there is opposition from the people”

In Latin America, "there is opposition from the people"

The Marseilles: Comment
Progressive forces are stationed in Latin America
?

Maurice Lemoine: The question that arises today is whether the left, or the left, differs in Latin America from whether they are in a “remounteda” as we say in football. At one point, there were difficulties at the end of the cycle, difficulties on the left, turning right in Argentina, and difficulties in Venezuela. Alberto Fernandez’s victory in Argentina for two years has turned left, with opposition from Venezuela, Cuba and Nicaragua falling victim to the US occupation. The return of the Movement to Socialism (MAS) in Bolivia and the victory of Louis Ars after the coup against Evo Morales. In Ecuador, in the second round of the presidential election in April, Rafael Korea’s Dolphin Andre Auras, who is part of this giant pink-and-red wave of Latin America in power, has a chance to win. With Chavez in Venezuela, Lula and Dilma Rousseff in Brazil, and Kirschner in Argentina for almost two decades … we are at a time when the left seems to be recovering.

How do you explain this? “ Come back From left?

ML: The neo-liberal policies implemented by the right-wing governments that seized power were quickly determined by the people and we are on a fundamental issue. Management is disastrous. If you add the catastrophe of the Covit-19 epidemic, even if it is not specific to Latin America … then, as far as Bolivia is concerned, we had these modern plots because they competed and it did not seem like a conspiracy with street tanks. After a year of power administration by Jeanine Ages, the Bolivians fully realized, resisted, and a year later changed course. There is popular opposition to the new liberal policies. If we take the case of Ecuador, we feel that in the first round 68% of the electorate voted against the candidate Guillermo Lasso, who represents the neo-liberal right. The three parties represented the forces of the left, and there were great differences between them, but organizations that presented themselves as neo-liberal opposition.

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What change will Joe Biden’s election make in the relationship between the United States and its neighbors?

ML: Unfortunately not. During the most severe crises in Venezuela and Cuba, they were hit by so-called “sanctions” by the United States, but they were in fact unilateral coercive measures. To allow someone, you have to have moral authority, not America. Pitton’s policy is not going to change fundamentally. A White House spokesman said a few days ago that Cuba was not a priority during the Obama administration and that Trump had fully returned. In Venezuela, they have made it clear that they will continue to impose sanctions, but unlike Trump, Biden is doing so in a ridiculous and very violent way, including threatening military intervention.

He will try to work in a multifaceted way, so he will rely on conservative parties in the European Union and Latin America to deepen sanctions. It is a tragedy for the people of Venezuela that these sanctions have a completely devastating effect on a situation that has become so difficult.

Exactly, how does the EU react to these legal twists (Lula, Ages, etc.)?

ML: There are differences. We notice that the EU did not mobilize when we imprisoned Lula, even though Jeanine was more sympathetic to him than Aziz. The coup in Bolivia was approved by the European Union, which did not protest when Evo Morales was ousted. At the end of Trump’s term, as for Venezuela, Europe was asked whether it would continue to recognize President Juan Guido, who declared himself, the EU said. Attend She waited for Biden’s end. Unfortunately, Europe is behaving like America’s. There is a significant difference, with the Biden administration continuing to recognize Juan Guido as interim leader of Venezuela, while the EU has taken a step back and now only recognizes him as the leader of the opposition.

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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