Clashes between pro-democracy protesters and police

Clashes between pro-democracy protesters and police

Rubber bullets, tear gas and water cannons used by the Grand Palace in Bangkok on Saturday before police dispersed a demonstration of democratic orientation, AFP journalists were observed on the spot.

“You’re breaking the law!” Speakers said that the police, the protesters used ropes to the walls of the containers were moved in front of the palace.

Protesters cleared their way before throwing Molotov cocktails at dozens of police officers standing hundreds of meters away.

“Release our friends!” Demonstrators shouted at leaders of the pro-democracy movement who were arrested earlier this year. Police responded by firing rubber bullets and throwing tear gas canisters.

At 8:30 pm (1:30 pm GMT) only a small group of protesters were in front of the police.

Police have previously raided the “Thai” publication to seize 100 copies of a book written by activist and human rights lawyer Anon Namba entitled “A Monarchy, an Institution within Thai Society”.

“The next step is to call in experts to see if the book violates the law,” said Police Major Trrong Prasombongkol, AFP. “This descent has been linked to the demonstration since protesters announced on social media that they were distributing these books,” he added.

Protesters put the book online and called on supporters to print and read it during the protest.

According to media reports, about 3,000 police officers are stationed in Bangkok.

Since last summer, between July and December 2020, a sling wind has shaken the state with demonstrations gathering tens of thousands of people in the capital at the height of the protests.

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They resumed after the indictment in February, following the majestic majesty of four leaders of the movement who were subsequently denied bail.

One of the four activists was Parith Sivarak, also known as the Penguin, and Anon Namba, two prominent figures in the movement.

At least 57 protesters, including three minorities, have been charged under the lesser law.

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About the Author: Will Smith

Alfred Lee covers public and private tech markets from New York. He was previously a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Economics and Business Journalism at Columbia University, and prior to that was a reporter at the Los Angeles Business Journal. He has received a Journalist of the Year award from the L.A. Press Club and an investigative reporting award from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

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