Senate green light for Deb Holland, the first Native American minister in the United States

Feu vert du Sénat pour Deb Haaland, première personne amérindienne à devenir ministre aux Etats-Unis

At age 60, he was confirmed 40 by 51 votes as Home Secretary, a vast department that manages the vast natural resources of the vast federal lands (one-fifth of the country’s surface area), but Native American reservations.

Debb Holland is from Laguna Pueblo, New Mexico. She had already made history in 2018 as one of the first two Native American women to be elected to Congress.

“Ms. Hollande’s affirmation marks a major step in building a government that reflects all the prosperity and diversity of this country because Native Americans have long been neglected,” Senate Democratic majority leader Chuck Schumer said before the vote.

“By placing Ms. Hollande as head of the Interior Ministry, we are restoring the counters in the relationship between the Cooperative and the Native States, regaining cooperation, mutual respect and trust,” he said.

His candidacy was backed by a petition from about 120 tribal representatives urging him to “make history” by electing Joe Biden.

“I think it’s time to start asking the tribal people about climate change and the environment, not just our country – not just our country, but the whole world,” the elected official said as his name began to circulate.

“My ancestors made incredible sacrifices to allow me to follow my customs and traditions, and I will not miss them,” he promised during a meeting with AFP in 2018. He was elected shortly after being elected to the House of Representatives, which has been in office since January 2019.

Single mother, she won the drink in her youth and had to resort to government food stamps for a while.

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Prior to Mrs. Hollande, only one Native American was a member of the U.S. government: between 1929 and 1933, Charles Curtis, Vice President of Herbert Hoover, wanted to be remembered as “the Eighth Cow Indian and 100% Republican”.

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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