A “wandering” black hole – SUNDRIES – was spotted in space

A "wandering" black hole - SUNDRIES - was spotted in space

Scientists have long believed that black holes are relatively stable. They were thought to be located at the center of the galaxy, with everything else orbiting them.

But in a new study, they discovered a black hole moving into their own galaxy. The cause of the incident is unknown, according to The Astrophysical Journal.

Scientists have focused on a special type of black hole called megasomers. These are miraculous black holes with an aggression disk of gas and dust. When the material is absorbed, they emit a large amount of heat and light. These substances also contain molecules (hydroxyl, water, formaldehyde and methane) that enhance fetal illumination at microwave lengths.

Representatives from the Harvard and Smithsonian Astronomical Observations studied 10 megamars. Nine of them are behaving as expected. But there was one exception.

The spiral galaxy J0437 + 2456, located 228 million light-years from Earth, contained an amazing black hole about 3 million times the mass of the Sun. The speed of its motion is significantly different from the speed of the galaxy.

According to the team’s analysis, the speed of the miraculous black hole is about 4,810 kilometers per second. The neutral hydrogen of the galaxy was moving at a speed of 4910 km per second. And the speed of the interior is 4860 km per second.

These measurements are completely different from each other. Scientists have not yet been able to say what caused the fluctuations.

There are many possible explanations. A galaxy can interact with another powerful object (another galaxy). One miraculous black hole collides with another miraculous black hole or finds an invisible “accessory” – a hole invisible to scientists due to the lack of radiation.

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Anyway, this is unusual news for physics. Scientists want to constantly observe matter and establish new facts about its properties.

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Cary Douglas

About the Author: Cary Douglas

Cary Douglas is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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