Great technology: New competition from Kafa

Collusions et collisions entre les géants de la tech

The respective backyards are not as protected as before


Left to right: Jeff Bezos, Tim Cook, Sunder Pichai and Mark Zuckerberg © Ciba

Technology companies have an interesting discourse property. Google and Zoom are verbs in English. Like Taoba in Chinese, the name of Alibaba’s vast digital mall. Its Chinese rivals Uber and Didi are similar to “Taxi”. Facebook means the Internet in Vietnam, where people mainly access the web through its social networks. Amazon, Apple, Microsoft and Netflix are not words for online shopping, smartphones, office software and video streaming, respectively – but they may be.

“Apple, Microsoft and Netflix are not words for online shopping, smartphones, office software and video streaming, respectively – but they may be.”

According to technical critics, these limited regulations point to something insidious, summarizing the dominance each company has over its digital stronghold – some of which may have been poorly acquired. In December, anti-US officials filed a lawsuit against Facebook for anti-competitive behavior, and anti-Chinese anti-trust officials launched an investigation into Alibaba. At the center of one of three hopeless lawsuits against Google is that the company pays Apple between $ 8 billion and $ 12 billion a year – one-fifth of Apple’s global profits – for its machine. Search will appear on Apple devices by default. Google has also reportedly struck a deal with Facebook not to support the competitive advertising system offered by newspaper publishers.

Attempts to sever linguistic ties are on the rise. Epic Games, a video game company that claims that Apple is cheating app developers in its App Store, has filed complaints against the company in the United States and Europe. On February 22, Britain’s competition watchdog warned that it would take “hopeless action” against big technology. The European Union has been active in development […]

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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