Burmese people hang women’s clothes to prevent the army

Burmese people hang women's clothes to prevent the army

Burmese protesters hang women’s clothing on the streets to stop soldiers because it is considered an “unfortunate” item for men in this country.

Images and videos circulating on social media today show protesters in many parts of Myanmar hanging up women’s clothing and even underwear to act as “spiritual barriers” to prevent women from entering.

“We hang women’s clothes on the streets because, according to ancient beliefs, if we step on top of women’s clothes, we will lose our luck,” said a 20-year-old protester.

“The younger generation no longer believes in this concept, but the players see it as an unfortunate thing. It is their weakness. Fencing off women’s clothing gives us more time. Run away in an emergency,” said another protester.

On March 6, Myanmar people hang women’s clothes to stop troops in Yangon. Video: Reuters.

According to the traditional view in Myanmar, getting under women’s clothing, especially underwear, is not only an omen, it is an insult to men. It appears that Myanmar police and soldiers removed the fence of these garments before landing on them.

Representatives of the Myanmar Police and Army have not yet commented.

The Myanmar military has recently sent troops to major cities to prevent anti-coup protests that show no signs of cooling off. Despite experiencing “bloody days,” the Burmese people are determined to take to the streets against the military government, causing dozens of deaths, including children.

According to the United Nations, more than 50 Myanmar protesters have been killed in attacks by security forces, and on March 3 alone, the number of victims was 38. At that time, at least 5 Burmese children were shot dead and at least 4 seriously injured.

Ngoc Anh (Follow Reuters)

See also  The Ministry of Health confirms that the variant delta will already be in Bogot

You May Also Like

About the Author: Will Smith

Alfred Lee covers public and private tech markets from New York. He was previously a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Economics and Business Journalism at Columbia University, and prior to that was a reporter at the Los Angeles Business Journal. He has received a Journalist of the Year award from the L.A. Press Club and an investigative reporting award from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *