Google and Facebook will (finally) pay for the media

Google and Facebook will (finally) pay for the media

This is a major event that is currently of concern only to Australia. After months of tug-of-war between these two digital giants and a major event for the Australian government, a law has been officially adopted, so – this is the first time in the world. Thus Facebook was re-established on Friday Access to news content for its Australian users This milestone law, after reaching an agreement with the government, forced the media, like other technology companies, to pay.

Australians can finally reconnect on Facebook

Australian media Facebook pages can be refreshed Friday morning for the first time in a week as social networking has blocked the publication of links to articles in local or international media in response to a bill regulating the relationship between traditional media and technology companies. .

Facebook and Google initially reacted harshly to the bill, voted Thursday and demanded that the media pay to restart their content. Google, which threatened to suspend its search engine in Australia to avoid being allowed, agreed last week to pay “significant sums” in exchange for content from Australian press groups, including News Corp. By Rupert Murdoch and Nine Entertainment, two main things. The exact size is unknown, however.

For its part, Facebook, which relies less on the media, went so far as to temporarily block news content from displaying its denial. Many official recovery services Facebook pages have also been accidentally compromised.

Faced with the outcry, Facebook finally withdrew, sealing a last-minute deal with Canberra over media compensation for content aired on its sites.

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Fierce war between technology companies and governments

Following the compromise, Facebook promised to “want more than ever to interact with newspaper editors” and, like Google, pledged to invest at least $ 1 billion in news content worldwide over the next three years.

Google has also promised that newspaper publishers will pay to use their content in a new tool called the Google News Showcase, as well as Facebook for people appearing on “News”, a product that will be used in the coming months in Australia.

The law passed in Australia on Thursday is seen as the first in a bitter battle between technology companies and national regulatory authorities. According to Canberra, press groups can be guaranteed, in the face of serious financial difficulties, “fair pay in exchange for the content they create, thus helping to support the public interest press in Australia”.

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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