The U.S. Civil Aviation Authority ordered an inspection of Boeing 777 liners after the incident

The U.S. Civil Aviation Authority ordered an inspection of Boeing 777 liners after the incident

FAA President Steve Dixon said some liners could not fly for at least some time due to additional studies.

He held a meeting with a team of aviation experts following the crash of a Boeing 777 engine on Saturday as the liner took off from Denver.

“I instructed them to release emergency or advanced aerial operation of Boeing 777 aircraft equipped with the Brad & Whitney PW4000 engines, which require immediate or advanced inspection.” “Twitter” In the Dixon message published.

The Point 777-200, with 231 passengers and 10 crew, saw the burning Starboard engine and vibrating section. When the liner returned to Denver Airport, his full engine hood was missing.

No one was injured on the plane or on the ground in the incident, officials said.

S. According to Dixon, the initial data of the study showed the need for further study of turbine blades in liner engines.

“Based on preliminary information, we have decided to reduce the inspection gap for unique blank plates for engines of this type used only on Boeing 777 aircraft,” the FAA chairman said.

He said FAA officials will meet with representatives of Brad & Whitney and Boeing on Sunday evening.

The incident involved a UA328 liner on a flight from Denver to Honolulu. The engine crashed shortly after takeoff.

Residents of the suburbs of Broomfield, Denver, found large wreckage of an airplane in their settlement, which contained a large metal ring that had fallen into someone’s yard.

The pilots were able to land the liner safely.

News agency BNS is not permitted to publish, quote or reproduce information in the mass media and websites without the written permission of the UAP “BNS”.

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About the Author: Will Smith

Alfred Lee covers public and private tech markets from New York. He was previously a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Economics and Business Journalism at Columbia University, and prior to that was a reporter at the Los Angeles Business Journal. He has received a Journalist of the Year award from the L.A. Press Club and an investigative reporting award from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

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