67 years of space conquest

67 years of space conquest


Portfolio – This February 18, 2021, at 10 pm, NASA’s mobile robot will descend into an abyss on Mars to search for traces of “diligent” life. In this case, we look back at some of the best times to capture space.

On October 4, 1954, the Soviets launched the world’s first satellite, Sputnik-1, with a Semiorka rocket.

Photo credit: NASA

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On April 12, 1961, Russia’s Yuri Gagarin became the first man in the world to be sent into space by an Soviet orbiter. In the photo, in July 1961, he walks to a meeting in London to cheer him on.

Photo credit: AFP

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On June 16, 1963, Russian Valentina Tereshkova became the world’s first woman to fly in space. He is in training at the Pyongyang site (Kazakhstan) a few days before his departure.

Photo credit: AFP

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On November 3, 1957, the world’s first living animal, the Russian dog Laska, was launched into space aboard the Sputnik-2.

Photo credit: AFP

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On March 18, 1965, Soviet Alexei Leonov became the world’s first man to go out of space. He is depicted in 1965 on a stamp of his glory.

Photo credit: D.R.

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On November 26, 1965, France launched its first satellite. In this photomontage, you can see the “Diamond A” rocket (right) responsible for placing the “Asterix” in orbit (left). The launch takes place from Hammagur in the Algerian Sahara Desert. France then becomes the 3rd world space power. The “Asterix” weighs 42 kg and will run until August 26, 1968.

Photo credit: AFP

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“A Great Step for Mankind”: On July 20, 1969, the United States crossed a major milestone in the conquest of space, with the Apollo 11 mission commissioned by NASA. Americans were the first men to live on television and walk on the moon around the world. Here, Neil Armstrong and “Bus” Aldrin unfurl the American flag.

Photo credit: AFP NASA

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However, on July 20, 1969, Aldrin photographed a “bus” not far from the lunar block.

Photo credit: AFP

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Aldrin’s shoe print on the “bus” on lunar soil during the “Apollo 11” mission is here.

Photo credit: AFP

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From December 7 to 19, 1972, the Apollo spacecraft sent its last lunar mission. From left to right, Apollo 17 crew: Ronald Evans, Eugene Chernon and Harrison Schmidt

Photo credit: AFP

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On December 24, 1979, Europe launched the first Ariane rocket from the Guerrero base (Guyana). Developed by the European Space Agency, the project makes it possible to put European satellites into orbit. Here, technicians work before the rocket takes off.

Photo credit: AFP

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On April 12, 1981, the first spacecraft, the Columbia, was launched by NASA.

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On June 12, 1982, Jean-Loop became the first French and Western European to travel into Cretan (left) space. Here, in the company of Russian astronauts Vladimir Zanibekov (center) and Alexander Ivanchenkov, before taking off from Pykonor on the Soyuz T-6 spacecraft.

Photo credit: AFP

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On January 28, 1986, the American spacecraft “Challenger” crashed during takeoff, killing seven crew members during its tenth flight. The crash, which aired live on television around the world, put an end to the “Challenger” program.

Photo credit: AFP

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On February 20, 1986, the Russians put the first element of their space station, Mir, into orbit. Here is a photo taken in January 1997.

Photo credit: AFP

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On March 6, 1986, Soviet spacecraft Vega 1 flew over Halley’s Comet. A fleet of five astronauts, two Soviet Vega 1 and Vega 2, two Japanese Saki Chuck and Soosai and a European Jioto were launched in 1985, which was assigned to the comet. On March 14, 1986, Giotto reached the comet.

Photo credit: ESA

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On April 25, 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope was launched by NASA. The next day astronaut and astronomer Steven Howley was placed in orbit around the Earth.

Photo credit: AFP

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November 20, 1998, Establishment of the first module of the Future International Space Station (ISS). Here is a view of the station taken by the Atlantis SDS-135 mission team in July 2011.

Photo credit: AFP

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On April 28, 2001, California businessman Dennis Tito became the first astronaut aboard the Russian cruise ship Soyuz TM-32.

Photo credit: NASA

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On October 21, 2001, Claudie Heinere became the first French woman in space. He is participating in the “Andromeda” mission at the International Space Station. Here, in training in Russia, in July 2001.

Photo credit: AFP

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On January 14, 2005, the European explorer Huygens landed on Titan, one of Saturn’s satellites.

Photo credit: NASA

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On December 9, 2012, Curiosity’s image of sedimentary sediments in the Gale Reef reaches Earth.

Photo credit: AFP

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After 10 years of space travel, the European space probe “Rosetta” lands on Wednesday, November 12, 2014. The tiny robot Philia lands on a comet for the first time in history: “Touche”.

Photo credit: MEDIALIAB / ESA

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Thomas Baskett, the first Frenchman in space since 2008. At 38, he is the youngest European astronaut on the International Space Station (ISS). There are 196 days from November 17, 2016 to June 2, 2017.

Photo credit: ESA / Bill Stafford

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On January 3, 2019, the first moon will land at a distance from the moon, the Chinese lander Song 4. Here, the panorama of the lunar landing site.

Photo credit: CNSA

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Elon Musk’s private company SpaceX launches their Falcon 9 rocket and their crew dragon capsule to the International Space Station (ISS) on May 30, 2020, using 2 astronauts. It was the first manned spacecraft to be commissioned by a private company.

Photo credit: Bill Incals / NASA / AFP

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One American astronaut (Kathleen Rubins) and two Russian astronauts (Sergei Raishikov and Sergei Good-Sverdkov) were able to reach the International Space Station (ISS) in three hours instead of the usual six. .

Credit Photo: Andre Shelfin / AFP

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Three Americans, Michael Hopkins, Victor Clover and Shannon Walker, and Japanese astronaut Sochi Nokuchi flew the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on November 15, 2020 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, USA. They will ship, two Russians and an American on Tuesday, November 17, 2020 at the station (ISS), where they will stay for six months.

Photo credit: GREGG NEWTON / AFP

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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