Australia: Dozens of Drought Animals Saved … Vombats!

Australia: Dozens of Drought Animals Saved ... Vombats!

These Australian marsupials still make headlines. The reason? As the mainland of the island is affected by drought, the vampires allow other creatures to drink.

The years are the same for vampires. Last year, Australia was devastated by a violent fire. These marsupials allowed many animals to escape the flames. Twelve months later, they are raised as heroes again, this time to “help” other creatures to survive the drought.

With rounded heads, massive noses and short legs, vampires look like adorable little bears. You may have heard of them before because they are made Heavy droplets ! Weighing up to 35 kg, these marsupials live in the mountain forests of Australia. They are famous for building large, elaborate purse with multiple entrances, interconnected and well insulated from the surface. It was in this purse that the animals took refuge, the ability to dig holes that work wonders.

Vombats can dig deep burrows

Ted Finney, a former veterinarian near Merriva, north of Sydney, told reporters that vampires living on his land dug deep into the ground until it reached groundwater level. In a region severely affected by drought, it is a blessing to the animals in the region that it has not rained for three years.

If the hole has been long, the vampires have made it bigger after the drought. “You can describe it as a groove, Said Ted Finney ABC.net.au. It is about 20 meters in diameter and probably four meters long. As the ditch dried up from the drought, the vampires dug even deeper to get closer to the water. ”

Until now, this waterhole has been used by vampires, kangaroos, walruses and walruses. But camera traps set up by the Hunter Regional Landcare Network show that after the drought, many animal species such as birds, cones, opossums, echidnas and emus have now come to drink there.

“They are great survivors”

According to Ted Finney, the Vampires are real heroes. “They just keep the hole open and accessible. I think it’s amazing how smart nymphs look when they survive; they are great survivors. Especially since they were able to survive. Provide deep water.”

Julie Old, a biologist at the University of Sydney, visited farmers’ properties. “It’s like wombs to find water. They find water and dig holes to access it. She announced. We often call vampires environmental engineers because they dig burrows and create habitat for other animals. In this case, the aquifer in Dead Land was created by this environmental engineer: Wombat “.

Also read:

The “carrier” pigeon, which was accused of coming to Australia illegally, has finally escaped
Fire in Australia: One year after a terrible fire accident, what are the remains of wildlife?
Australia: Attacked by a shark, a diver pictures their fight

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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