When Bernard Arnold advises Joe Biden …

Jamie Dimon

This is a small piece of information that went almost unnoticed on Joe Biden’s inauguration day. A document emphasizing the worst issues to be dealt with without delay among the group preparing to come to power with Joe Biden, According to an article published on Tuesday, January 19th New York Times.

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“Business leaders need to realize that they have not only an economic obligation, but also a business interest in promoting a better and more equitable system. Until the critical issue of inequality is resolved, the goals and other interests of others will not be achieved,” the U.S. newspaper quoted as saying.

This document comes from a team every year, in a very sensible way, by Jamie Dimon, CEO of JPMorgan Bank. It includes former British Prime Minister Tony Blair, former US Secretary of Defense Condoleezza Rice and Henry Kissinger, former US Secretary of Defense Robert Gates and several international leaders, including the French. Bernard Arnold, CEO of LVMH Group, Alex Korsky, American, Johnson & Johnson, a healthcare company, and Joseph Sai, Taiwan-Canadian vice president of the Chinese group Alibaba.

Timon calls for the good separation of the public interest from the personal interests of large groups

In the context of the global epidemic and the very specific transition of power in the United States, these top advisers, who did not have the support of outgoing President Donald Trump, documented this time their ideas for a departure from the Trump era, in a formalized form. They call to leave America first And rehabilitating globalization – an idea that would be considered a bad word by an outgoing president – while fixing the excess. Jamie Timon’s advisers are also calling for a renewal of relations with China.

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The lack of US leadership under Donald Trump is related to the nationalist approach adopted by many countries, which has come at the expense of a “consistent and international response to the epidemic,” which the document condemns.

Jamie Dimon calls on business leaders to defend the public policy of public interest in spite of these measures, to combat the increasingly widespread idea of ​​cooperation between populism and politics and business. Harming their own short-term financial interests.

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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