Biden Change Updates: NPR

Biden Change Updates: NPR

Sen. of the Republican Party of Iowa. Chuck Crosley, who was filmed in the Capitol on Friday, admitted on Monday that Election College confirms the election of Joe Biden as president. Many Republicans have not done so until now.

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Sen. of the Republican Party of Iowa. Chuck Crosley, who was filmed in the Capitol on Friday, admitted on Monday that Election College confirms the election of Joe Biden as president. Many Republicans have not done so until now.

Stephanie Reynolds / Getty Images

With the Electoral College vote now over, the Senate acknowledges that the new wave of Republicans has been clear for weeks: Joe Biden has been elected president.

In the days leading up to the November 3 election, a handful of GOP senators – mostly moderates – acknowledged the victory of Biden and vice-president-elect Kamala Harris. Since then, many Chamber Republicans have instead postponed President Trump’s legal challenges.

That began to change on Monday. Iowa Sen. In some cases, like Chuck Crosley, they admit it with some reluctance.

“It doesn’t matter what Chuck Crosley thinks, the Constitution has answered that question for you,” Crosley said minutes after California’s election vote confirmed Biden’s victory. “That’s all I can say.”

However, a new wave of members leaned on plans for the upcoming Biden presidency.

“It certainly looks like that, and I think it’s time to turn the page and start a new administration,” said Sen. of West Virginia. Shelley Moore Capito told a Capitol Hill Pool reporter.

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Others on that camp include South Dakota Senate Majority Whip John Dune and Sense. Roy Blunt of Missouri, John Cornin of Texas, Tham Dillis of North Carolina and Kevin Kramer of North Dakota.

“At some point you have to face the music. Once the election college has solved the problem today, it’s time for everyone to move forward,” Dune told reporters.

Biden, who was elected president, said the remaining legal issues are pending, Dillis said.

“He’s a speculative president,” Dillis said. “But the validity of being resolved in the next two weeks, I do not want to dismiss legal conflicts.”

When asked, Kramer stopped using the phrase “president-elect” to describe Peter, but agreed.

“I think if you officially call someone after election college, I’ll be fine,” Kramer said.

Sen. of Ohio. Rob Portman was one of the first to issue clear statements confirming success.

“Even though I supported President Trump, the election college poll today makes it clear that Joe Biden is now elected president,” he said.

Retired Tennessee Sen. Lamar Alexander took that approval one step further, urging Trump to end his claims.

“The presidential election is over. The states have certified the vote. The courts have resolved the conflict. The voters have voted. President Trump will put the country first, be proud of his significant achievements, and help Biden, who was elected president, get off to a good start,” Alexander said. “Especially during these epidemics, the orderly shift in power is crucial.”

Still, many of their peers hold the balance. Some, including Kentucky Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, declined to comment, and did not respond to repeated questions from reporters on Monday.

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“I will call him Joe until he takes office,” said South Carolina Sen. When asked by Lindsay Graham, she said before mentioning that there are some legal challenges.

Oklahoma’s Jim Inhof and Wyoming’s John Paraso are not yet ready to accept the presidency on Monday.

“Not yet,” Inhof said.

Trump and Republican-led efforts to thwart elections – citing widespread unsubstantiated allegations of widespread voter fraud – Michigan Representative Paul Mitchell is part of a cause for retirement CNN On Monday he left his party and became independent.

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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