Gemini meteor shower to magnify Scotland with incredible night-sky view this weekend

Gemini meteor shower to magnify Scotland with incredible night-sky view this weekend

Scots can see one of the ‘most impressive’ scenes Comets This weekend.

The Gemini meteor shower is an annual event that takes place every December as the Earth passes through a cloud. Comet dust.

It is expected to peak on Sunday evening and will be visible in the sky until early Monday morning.

The night-sky view is considered one of the most impressive of the year, with 70 meteors running in the sky per hour.

70 meteors are expected to magnify in Scotland on Sunday night

Experts say the absence of the moon will ensure that the meteorites stand bright in the evening.

Geminites are formed from a rocky asteroid called Python 3200 with a comet-like orbit, and were first seen in 1862.

Meteors, small fragments of galaxy debris emanating from near the brightest star cast in the galaxy Gemini.

Friction with the upper atmosphere heats the incoming debris so that the air around them glows brightly.

This leads to lines of light, also known as shooting stars.

According to the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, Geminites are unusual because they can be many colors – mainly white, some yellow and a few green, red and blue.

These colors are partly caused by traces of metals such as sodium and calcium, the same effect is used to color crackers, experts at the Royal Laboratory said.

Geminites enter the Earth’s atmosphere at an angle and travel at a speed of about 79,200 miles per hour, having a slower closing speed than other comets.

See also  Haspel photographed 'cosmic jewelry' 68 million light years away

By comparison, Perseids will approach Earth at 133,200 mph and Leonids at 162,000 mph.

To see the rain, visitors have to look upwards after 10pm UK By Sunday, experts in the Royal Astronomical Society said the southeast sky would be high in radiation.

The best views are always away from city lights, but even urban astronomers with clear skies should see at least some meteorites, they added.

The rain will continue until December 17.

You May Also Like

About the Author: Cary Douglas

Cary Douglas is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *