The multi-colored meteor shower is particularly bright this year because the moon will not get in the way

The multi-colored meteor shower is particularly bright this year because the moon will not get in the way

The Royal Astronomical Society says multi-colored meteors will be particularly bright this year because the moon will not get in the way.

Stargazers in the Northern Hemisphere can see 70 meteors per hour this Sunday as the Earth passes through a cloud of cometary dust.

The sky view of the shooting stars will be particularly important because it will be a new moon, i.e. it will not be visible in the sky to interfere with the view.

“While some meteors are very bright, some are considerably dimmer, so you need a dark sky to get the best view.

“If there was a full moon in the sky, the whole sky would glow softly, which means you would see fewer meteors,” explained Robert Massie, RAS ‘deputy managing director.

The Gemini meteor shower, which returns every December, is expected to peak for some time during the night of December 13 and be visible until the early hours of December 14. Geminites are formed from a rocky asteroid 3200 Python with a comet-like orbit, first seen in 1862.

Meteorites, interplanetary debris, emerge from near the brightest star cast in the Gemini galaxy.

Friction with the upper atmosphere heats the incoming debris so that the air around them glows brightly.

This leads to lines of light, also known as shooting stars.

According to the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, Geminites are unusual because they can be many colors – mainly white, some yellow and a few green, red and blue.

These colors are partly caused by traces of metals such as sodium and calcium, the same effect is used to color crackers, experts at the Royal Laboratory said.

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Experts from the Royal Astronomical Society said that after 10pm on Sunday, observers will be exposed to more radiation in the southeastern sky to see the rain.

The best views are always away from city lights, but even urban astronomers with clear skies should see at least some meteorites, they added.

The rain will continue until December 17.

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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