The Christmas star is visible in December – how to see it in the UK

The Christmas star is visible in December - how to see it in the UK

Jupiter and Saturn combine to form a “Christmas star” for the first time in 800 years.

The planets will line up on December 21 and appear as twin planets.

The Great Congregation, nicknamed the “Christmas Star” or the “Star of Bethlehem”, has not been seen for 800 years.

According to Forbes, seeing this ratio “once in a lifetime” will not happen again until 2080, and then after 2400.

What is a Christmas star?

Jupiter and Saturn seem to be getting closer to each other and colliding at the end of this month.

Gas giants will be closer to the night sky above Christmas than they have been for centuries.

But NASA actually said they were actually hundreds of millions of miles away.

Sky view – local weather allows – visible from anywhere on earth

This connection is said to have last been seen in the 13th century, and it is said that it will not happen again until 2080.

Astronomers who spoke with Forbes magazine said such an alignment was very rare to observe.

Patrick Hardigan, an astronomer at Rice University in Texas, said: “Alignments between these two planets are very rare, occurring once every 20 years.

“This connection is exceptionally rare because of how close the planets appear to each other.”

He added: “On the morning of March 4, 1226, you must go back to see a closer alignment between these objects visible in the night sky.”

When will it be known?

The “Christmas Star” will be available to Stargazers on the evening of December 21st this month.

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It has been reported that Stargazers should expect the celestial phenomenon to present itself after sunset.

It can be found anywhere on earth where the sky is clear.

That means people in the UK should watch the event from 3.53pm.

The “star” appears much lower on the horizon after sunset, requiring a telescope or telescope.

Professor Hardigan noted that planetary twins appear less frequently in the western sky around sunset each evening – and should be bright enough to be seen in the middle of the twilight sky.

“An observer is still north, with less time to see the planets merge before sinking below the horizon,” Professor Hardigan explained.

“When the sky is completely dark in Houston, for example, the fusion will be 9 degrees above the horizon,” he said.

“The weather will cooperate and manage to see if there is unobstructed view of the southwest.” ”

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Cary Douglas

About the Author: Cary Douglas

Wayne Ma is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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