The source of the rapid radio explosion was found

For the first time, scientists a Fast Radio Explosion (FRB) It came from inside our own Milky Way galaxy.
The brilliant flashes of energy last only a short time A fraction of a second Their evidence has been confusing astronomers since the FRB was first discovered in 2007.

For years, mysterious radio signals sparked speculation that they might have come from an alien world.

Now researchers report that they first detected FRBs in our own galaxy in April.

File photo of fast radio explosion detected from space. (Credit: Malasani / Petraf) (Provided)

But their source is more ‘zombie’ than strangers.

Radio pulses – the closest to Earth – are monitored by a magnet called SGR 1935 + 2154.

According to NASA, magnets have magnetic fields stronger than 100 trillion refrigerator magnets.

Scientists believe they can induce energy, and then it shocks their surroundings. This will cause massive emissions on the radio and other wavelengths.

But a ‘zombie’ magnet based on SGR 1935 + 2154, a fracturing magnetic field could trigger the FRP detected earlier this year, the study said.

The idea of ​​an artist as a magnet. (European Southern Laboratory / L. Calcada) (Provided)
“There is this great mystery behind the revelation of this great energy, which we have so far seen coming from half the universe,” said Kiyoshi Masui, a Massachusetts professor of technical physics and one of the researchers. The Independent.

“This is the first time that one of these fascinating fast radio explosions has been linked to an astronomical object.”

Twenty years of the International Space Station

Study, published In the journal Nature, Announced by two independent radio telescope facilities in North America.
READ  Archaeology news: Scientists explore remnants of prehistoric fossil's past meal | Planet | News

You May Also Like

Cary Douglas

About the Author: Cary Douglas

Wayne Ma is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *