The mutation strain of COVID-19 causes most of the new epidemics in Europe and has spread across the continent by tourists, scientists say

The mutation strain of COVID-19 causes most of the new epidemics in Europe and has spread across the continent by tourists, scientists say
  • Scientists say most new cases of COVID-19 in Europe come from a mutant variant of the virus that spread from Spain to tourists. In a statement on Thursday.

  • Scientists say the corona virus variant originated in northeastern Spain in June and was carried abroad by tourists and other travelers.

  • There is not enough data to suggest this variant, known as 20A.EU1, according to a team from the University of Basel, ETH Zurich in Basel and SeqCOVID in Spain.

  • This variant, known as 20A.EU1, has been identified in 12 countries of the continent, including Hong Kong and New Zealand.

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Scientists say most of the new COVID-19 cases in Europe originate from mutations in the virus that began in Spain and spread across the continent by tourists. In a statement on Thursday.

This variation may have originated from agricultural workers in northeastern Spain, which was first recorded in June.

A team of scientists at the University of Basel, ETH Zurich in Basel and SeqCOVID in Spain attributed the early spread of the virus to the suspicious “supersporter” event. Spreads abroad by tourists And other passengers.

By October, the variant had been identified in 12 countries across the continent, including Hong Kong and New Zealand.

There is no data yet to suggest that this variant is too dangerous, they said.

The variant of SARS-CoV-2, also known as 20A.EU1, spread to at least six European countries by the end of July.

There are hundreds of strains of the virus in Europe, but some are as widespread as the 20A.EU1 cluster, scientists said.

“This variant, 20A.EU1, and the second variant, 20A.EU2 … are the most recent sightings in Europe,” the scientists said.


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Holidaymakers returning from Spain played a significant role in the spread of the virus across Europe, the researchers said.

More than four in five new cases of the virus in the UK come from this variant, and scientists linked it to about 250 individual viral outbreaks in the country in July and August.

In comparison, the analysis of viral footage in Hong Kong suggests that the infections came from one source, and that the New Zealand samples may have come from three separate exchanges in Europe.

Scientists say the variation is mainly within Europe due to intercontinental travel. Authorities have allowed isolated travel to certain parts of the summer.

The spread of 20A.EU1 across Europe “indicates that summer travel guidelines and restrictions are generally inadequate to prevent the spread of introductions,” scientists said.

The team added that the variant may be more contagious than conventional SARS-CoV-2 strain, but said it was “particularly difficult” to determine why the variant spreads so quickly.

They added that scientists do not know if this variation is too severe due to lack of data. Genetic monitoring allows this cluster to be detected and monitored, but “the lack of a consistent and consistent sequence across Europe still limits our efforts.”

Governments should take the data into account when planning a trip across Europe, the researchers added.

The report comes after both France and Germany announced stricter locking restrictions on Wednesday.

Countries face a month-long lockout where bars and restaurants will have to close again. In France, non-essential shops are not allowed to stay open, while in Germany, hotels cannot hold tourists and gyms and theaters have to be closed.

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Cary Douglas

About the Author: Cary Douglas

Wayne Ma is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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