Mars should be brighter than it has been in almost 20 years

Mars will appear bigger and brighter in the sky in October

For more than two years this month Mars will form the closest approach to Earth as it reaches its resistance in the night sky.

NASA described the appearance of the red planet as “effectively a ‘full’ Mars”, providing the best opportunity to see our planetary neighbor in almost 20 years.

On Tuesday, October 13, Mars will shine brighter than it has been since 2003, and will not appear like this again until 2035.

Every 26 months Mars reaches resistance, i.e. the Earth passes directly between the Sun and Mars.

The resistance of October is extra special because the orbits of Earth and Mars are so close to each other.

The astronomical phenomenon is that Mars rises when the sun sets and sets when the sun rises.

Combined with a new moon ‘Supermoon’ in the middle of the month, it will provide a rare opportunity for both ordinary skiers and experienced astronomers to see Mars in the most spectacular way.

With the naked eye, Mars will appear brighter and more unique in the night sky, while it will be easier to create features such as polar caps and volcanoes through the telescope.

Researchers say this finding may be important in the search for alien life because organisms need liquid water to survive.

October 2020 is the hottest month of the year in terms of near-Earth astronomical events.

Full moons are booked with the month A harvest moon A rare blue moon on Halloween in early October.

The Orionite meteor shower According to NASA, it is active from October 2 to November 7, bringing with it “prolonged bursts of light”.

The peak of meteor showers is expected on October 21, although several days will see strong views.

The U.S. space agency will see unusually large amounts of meteorites by 2020 – commonly referred to as ‘shooting stars’ – occurring up to 20 per hour.

Many apps and websites offer ways to track celestial events, including Sky View and Star Chart.

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Cary Douglas

About the Author: Cary Douglas

Wayne Ma is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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