7-day home quarantine for everyone arriving in Delhi on flights, trains, buses

Everyone arriving in Delhi by bus, train or flights will be quarantined for one week.

New Delhi:

Every person arriving in Delhi by train, bus, or plane will now have to undergo a mandatory quarantine at their home for a week, the Delhi government said, changing its previous rule where quarantine was not required. District administration officials are tasked with ensuring that the rule is followed.

Previously, the Delhi government had only advised that incoming people be monitored for the next 14 days and call the District Surveillance Officer or the National Call Center if they showed symptoms of coronavirus.

The adjustment in the rule followed an increase in cases in the national capital as a series of relaxations took effect during the last week.

Currently the national capital has 22,132 cases of coronavirus. However, the number of containment areas in Delhi is enormous. The expanding city has more than 120 containment zones.

Prime Minister Arvind Kejriwal, who previously made it clear that Delhi has no income, has announced a series of relaxations in line with central policies, including reopening salons and beauty salons.

But Delhi had also sealed its borders during the week, keeping only essential services out of that realm.

“We will make a decision again in a week to open the borders after seeking suggestions from citizens,” Kejriwal said.

India has recorded more than 2 lakh of coronavirus cases, with a record of 8,909 people testing positive for the infection in the last 24 hours ending this morning. Currently, the country is the seventh among the 10 nations most affected by the virus, with 2,07,615 cases, including 5,815 deaths.

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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