The older we get, the slower we change

The older we get, the slower we change

This is a new phase in the long hunt for biological aging causes. New, but not so new: The study was published in the April 13 issue of the journal NaturalIn fact, comes to check “One hypothesis was put forward in 1952 by the future Nobel laureate Peter Mayer [1915-1987]But so far it has not been proven: the notion that aging is caused by the accumulation of unavoidable mutations in the genes of our cells, at least in part, Hugo Aguilaniu, a geneticist and director of the Cherraphila Institute, refers to a non-profit Brazilian foundation. This accumulation will eventually trigger an important stage for the function of these cells. ⁇

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The immense development of sorting skills has changed the game. Thanks to this British researchers were able to prove the reality of this phenomenon. Coordinated by the Wellcome Sanker Institute (UK), they calculated DNA damage in the cells of sixteen mammals, including a wide range of lifespans and body sizes: cat, dog, horse, cow, rabbit, ferret, rat, rat, naked mole-rat, bear , Lion, tiger, ring tail lemon, black and white colopus and human species. For five of them, several individuals of different ages (56 in total) were analyzed.

As a result, long-lived species acquire DNA mutations more slowly in their physiological (non-sexual) cells than short-lived organisms. This observation explains in part the famous “Betto paradox” named after the British epidemiologist Richard Betto in 1977. A whale or elephant, for example, has many more cells and ‘lives longer than mice. One of their cells undergoes mutations – leading to its uncontrolled proliferation – so the probability is high. Logically, these behemoths should have a higher risk of cancer. However, that is not the case.

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The most significant differences

But how to estimate the accumulation rate of these mutations in the cells of each species? It’s hard to follow a person for a lifetime! The researchers therefore analyzed the genome of a particular type of cell relevant to this study: cells or “intestinal linings” that line the small folds of the inner wall of the colon. All cells of the same crypt – micro-binding by laser – are derived from the same ancestral stem cell and accumulate mutations linearly with age. In these cells, moreover, most mutations are caused by natural processes common to other tissues, rather than the expression of environmental toxins. It was sufficient to divide the number of mutations measured by the age of the individual being studied to obtain mutation rates for each species over many years.

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