Potato-shaped planet: New planet: Potato-like planet discovered in space, scientists shock – Scientific news: Astronomers have discovered the potato or rugby ball-shaped planet, one of the most unusual shapes ever seen.

Potato-shaped planet: New planet: Potato-like planet discovered in space, scientists shock - Scientific news: Astronomers have discovered the potato or rugby ball-shaped planet, one of the most unusual shapes ever seen.

Highlights:

  • Rugby ball in space
  • This strangely shaped planet was named WASP-103b
  • This planet is hotter and bigger than our sun

Paris, France:

Variety in your solar system Planet Yes, you know. But, something else in space Suryamala It also has bizarre planets. One of these planets looks like a potato. Some scientists describe the planet as ‘in space’ Rugby ballThey do that. The name of this planet WASP-103b Hercules is in the constellation. Nearby is the star WASP-103.

Significantly, this potato-shaped planet is hotter and larger than our Sun. The planet takes less than a day to complete a circle around its star.

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This is the first time the strangely shaped planet has been identified, according to the European Space Agency on Tuesday. Therefore, new information about the internal structure of such planets is available.

Of the agency Cheops space telescope, Based on new data obtained from NASA’s Hubble and Spitzer telescopes, the team of scientists reported this information about the WASP-103b.

Scientists have also published a research paper in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics. Of these, the planet twice as large as Jupiter and its inner structure are filled with Jupiter-like air. Researchers say the shape of the planet is like a potato, thanks to the Cheops Space Telescope.

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