Australian Open (F): Osaka retains title

Australian Open (F): Osaka retains title

“We’ll meet in Australia in fourteen hours.” Photo of her propping up while sitting on the plane (but not yet dressed as a tenniswoman), Naomi Osaka announced on Twitter on Monday that she was leaving for Melbourne. A way to formalize the Japanese participation in the Australian Open The ambiguity persists in the participation of many of his colleagues as his colleagues. World No. 1 and three-time winner Novak Djokovic has yet to announce who will win the tenth coronation of his favorite tournament next January, and has yet to reveal who he is in the same way. Vaccine or not. Osaka, last year, at the same stadium where he won two years ago – his second Grand Slam coronation at the time – So he will defend his trophy in Melbourne, waiting precisely for him to shine in the Major again since he came to register his name on the event’s gift list for the second time in his career last January. After winning the final against American Jennifer Brady in straight sets.

From the last Australian Open, Osaka could not be identified

Triggering mental anxieties is mainly related to managing the pressure on his shoulders because he has been one of the best athletes in the world and is therefore expected at every turn of his journey, and today the former host of the circuit he dropped to 13th in the opening row and left Roland-Carros. He then gave up Wimbledon, before stumbling, and then at the US Open, where he became the reigning champion again in the third round of the tournament with future finalist Leila Fernandez. It’s a shame she’s trying to wash away in Melbourne, she’s used to changing the worst from the beginning (eliminating the third round in 2020 and 2016, the second round in 2017 and the eighth round in 2018) and the best (twice in the final, 2019 and 2021).

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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