Scientists have discovered a planet 11 times larger than Jupiter in space

Scientists have discovered a planet 11 times larger than Jupiter in space

Bungalow Hunt News Desk: Scientists have discovered information that could change people’s thinking about planets and stars. The images you see with the report are not yet to be viewed according to the rules of space science. An image taken by the largest telescope in the European Southern Laboratory in Chile shows the binary star system P Centauri on the left, which does not completely solve the mystery of its two stars. 4 degrees, b centauri, about 325 light-years away, visible to the naked eye – no longer confusing with beta (β) centauri, one of the brightest stars in the sky.

According to the rules, the arrow pointing planet in the picture above is the first discovered planet in the solar system with the suffix “b”, giving it the unusual name: b Centauri b. It is a gas giant orbiting its star about 560 times farther than the Sun and Earth. This feature is one of the most distant planetary orbits ever discovered. (Transparent rings around stars and planets are works of art, the unrelated background star in the upper right.)

The mass of the planet is 11 times greater than that of Jupiter, which puts it in the upper range of what is still called the planet. Objects with a mass of 13 Jupiter or more are classified as brown dwarfs or failed stars.

However, the solar system of these two host stars has some features that actually distinguish astronomers from any other star. The estimated combined stars are 8 to 10 times larger than the Sun. Although it does not appear to be large, it is at least twice as complete as any other star (or star) that has confirmed the existence of a planet. The largest star in the Solar System is Spectral Type B, the second hottest group, and the problem with planetary formation around such hot stars is that they emit many strong ultraviolet and X-ray rays, which disrupt the planetary formation process. , Which is not the case.

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