The Solved Mystery of the Sigma Hole – Science – Life

The Solved Mystery of the Sigma Hole - Science - Life

In 2019, astronomers surprised the world with their first image Hole Negro

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The event was able to capture one of these astronomical objects located in the center of the Messier 87 galaxy, thanks to the Horizon Telescope (EHT) program, but its existence was predicted in 1915 by Albert Einstein in general theory of relativity.

Something similar happened in the Sigma hole; The random distribution of electron charge around the halogen atom was theoretically predicted about 30 years ago, but it has not been directly observed because, until now, Care Auxiliary nuclear structures are beyond the resolution of direct imaging systems, and this is unlikely to change.

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However, the Czech Institute for Advanced Technology and Research (CADRIN), the Czech Academy of Sciences ‘Physics Institute (FZU), the Czech Academy of Sciences’ Organic Chemistry and Biochemical Institute (IOCB Proc) of the University of Technology4 Presented, by which they followed the first system in the world. Sigma hole.

“I think you can say that subatomic resolution is going to have an impact on imaging in various fields of science such as chemistry, physics and biology.”

With his research, published Science, They were able to dramatically increase the resolving power of the scanning microscope, which helped mankind capture individual atoms many years ago, thus moving from the atomic level to the subatomic phenomena.

For Pavel Zelinek, from the FZU and Catrin, confirming the existence of theoretically predicted sigma holes is no different than observing. Black holes.

“Although predicted by the general theory of relativity in 1915, they were never seen until two years ago. In view of this, it would not be an exaggeration to say that the imaging of sigma reflects a similar milestone at the atomic level,” he said, adding that theoretical and experimental properties of molecular structures on the surface Leading expert in the study of solid materials.

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Although Zyro Alexis Rodriguez, a professor at the National University and holds a doctorate in physics, feels that comparison is mandatory when dealing with such distance courses, the Czech proposed method reflects an important fact due to its applications to a field such as chemistry. Quantum.

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“It’s important to try to understand how atoms are at the atomic level, how they function and how atomic quantities are structured, because their properties depend on it. For this reason, it is important to measure that atomic structure more accurately,” he explains.

In his opinion it would be even more interesting if it was taken to more complex systems than molecules or atoms. “It’s very difficult to determine the quantum properties of molecules in a very complex material. What these humans have tried to do is to define the atomic structure of anything as best as possible. Contains applications in areas.

According to Scientists Responsibility Study, The ability to capture a random electron density charge distribution in individual atoms allows, among other things, a better understanding of the reactivity of individual molecules and the reason for the formation of different molecular structures. “You could say that subatomic resolution is going to have an impact on imaging in various fields of science, such as chemistry, physics and biology,” says Zelinek.

ALEJANDRA LÓPEZ – Scientific writing
On Twitter: TiempodeCiencia

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About the Author: Cary Douglas

Cary Douglas is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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