New study gives Schrங்கdinger cat a 50% chance of surviving on new quantum computer logic

החתול של שרדינגר. המחשה: depositphotos.com

In existing quantum computers, quits look like a cat locked in a box with venom, which is 50% likely to be released, so the cat is “alive” and “dead” until the box is opened. The last test can be compared to four events – “whether the cat is dead”, “whether the venom was released”, “whether the venom was emitted”, or “whether the nucleus is triggered” – simultaneously at the top of four different timelines.

Schrங்கdinger’s cat. Description: depositphotos.com

Researchers at the Institute of Technological Innovation (TII) in the United Arab Emirates have demonstrated a new quantum computation technique in which changing the sequence of events can help solve a new type of problem. This is a new approach to quantum superposition phenomena that was previously applied to the position of quantum bits in quits, but not to the sequence of events.

Technically, this does not change the causal sequence of events that have already occurred. “It’s like traveling back in time, it’s impossible,” said Leonardo Alida of TII, general manager of quantum algorithms, co – author of the study. The research institute worked with a team of international researchers from Chile, Brazil, France, Spain and Switzerland on this study.

“We can’t use this process for public utility events. It’s like paper tape sent to different agents to read and write different sequences of instructions at the same time,” he explained.

Ordinary quantum computers (where quantum gates have a definite time sequence) are based on quantum superpositions. The difference is that they use superpositions of different quid levels, but do not use superpositions of different order of gates. This new approach means that the connections between different gates (quantum equivalent cables connecting different transistors in the circuit) are in a quantum superposition state.

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Aolita said, “It’s like elevating high levels and knitting to a level hierarchical level. Normal quantum computers use super positions of quid levels.

Now that researchers have proven the reliability of the technique in practice, the scientific community can begin to find a way to use it. People have studied causal superpositions in theory and have shown how they can function in the simple matter of using only two events in one superposition. But no one considers the context of most events where there is tremendous potential for new applications.

This study takes the classic example of Schrங்கdinger’s cat to a new level. In existing quantum computers, quits look like a cat locked in a box with venom, which is 50% likely to be released, so the cat is “alive” and “dead” until the box is opened. The last test can be compared to four events – “whether the cat is dead”, “whether the venom was released”, “whether the venom was emitted”, or “whether the nucleus was induced” – occurs. Overlapping four different timelines simultaneously.

Aolita hopes that research activities that demonstrate these processes in a working tool will motivate mathematicians and computer scientists to discover the practical application of this new effect. He said: “Our new system serves as a starting point for exploring new algorithm applications in this new and unusual quantum computer paradigm, from which we expect practical applications to emerge.”

With applications such as cipher cracking, there was a study of quantum superpositions of causal sequences at the same stage as quantum computers before Peter Schurr discovered the practical decay algorithm for primary factors. “We would like to discover the Taurus algorithm of quantum superpositions of causal arrangements,” Aolida said.

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About the Author: Cary Douglas

Cary Douglas is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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