September 11: Assorted FBI note cites Saudi involvement

September 11: Assorted FBI note cites Saudi involvement

The U.S. government on Saturday released an FBI note confirming Riyadh’s involvement in the September 11, 2001 attacks by al – Qaeda, but did not provide the expected evidence for the families of the victims prosecuting Saudi Arabia. Of the 19 hijackers who hijacked four planes, two were shot down in the twin towers of the World Trade Center, killing nearly 3,000 people and 15 Saudis.

The newly announced note, on the occasion of the twentieth anniversary of 9/11, dated April 4, 2016, underscores the connection between Omar al-Baomi, a suspected Saudi agent in California, and Nawaf al-Hashimi, one of the kidnappers. Hasmi and Khalid al-Mihtar are suspected of providing him with logistical assistance. This document is based on interviews conducted in 2009 and 2015, and its identity is in the file, describing the contacts of Umar al-Bayomi and his meetings with Nawaf al-Hasmi and Khalid al-Mihtar. Attacks.

It shows stronger ties than the two already known relations between the conservative Imam of the Los Angeles Mosque and Fahad al-Tumairi, who were recognized by the Saudi consulate in the late 1990s.

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According to the document, the telephone numbers associated with the source include those who helped Nawaf al-Hasmi and Khalid al-Mihtar, including Omar al-Bayomi and Fahad al-Tumai, and the source. The source told the FBI that al-Boumi held a “very high position” at the Saudi consulate beyond his official student status. “Biomi’s assistance to Hamsi and Mita includes translations, travel, accommodation and finance,” the note said. The source’s wife, al-Bayumi, often spoke of “jihad,” the document continued.

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The note establishes other links through meetings, telephone conversations, or other communications between al-Baomi and Tumai with al-Qaeda-linked al-Qaeda propagandist US-Yemen Anwar al-Alagi, who was killed on the Arabian Peninsula (Aqba). Yemen in September 2011. However, the published document was heavily edited and did not provide direct contact between the Saudi government and the smugglers. It was classified after US President Joe Biden was pressured by the victim’s family to sue Saudi Arabia for complicity in the attacks.

Three successive administrations have refused to declare and release documents on the attacks and have been accused of seeking to protect the historic alliance between Washington and Riyadh. The Sunny Oil Monarchy has denied any involvement in the September 11, 2001 attacks, and in 2004 the U.S. Commission of Inquiry dismissed the allegations. Said Jim Grindler, one of the leading lawyers involved in the victims’ family cases against Saudi Arabia. This categorical reference confirmed the main argument regarding the Saudi government’s support for the kidnappers.

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“With this first classification of documents, twenty years of Saudi Arabia relying on the US government to cover up its role in 9/11 are coming to an end,” Jim Grindler said in a statement. Families are waiting for strong evidence, with the release of more classified documents expected within the next six months under an administrative order issued by Joe Biden in early September.


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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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