New York Bike Delivery Men risk their lives during a storm

New York Bike Delivery Men risk their lives during a storm

The video of a New York delivery boy pushing his bike up to his waist with water to bring food at midnight is libel. Officials are asking customers to stop delivering orders.

In the vicinity of New York and the megalopolis, the rain caused by Hurricane Ida has already killed fifty people. Citizens take refuge in their homes. But some do not hesitate to risk the lives of distributors to order food to be eaten in a warm and dry place.

In a video with more than 11 million views, a delivery boy working at a croup painfully pushes his bike down Brooklyn Street at midnight. He has water up to his waist. He has food on hand that he tries to protect in order to deliver it to the person who ordered it. The scene was filmed at the height of the storm, from Wednesday to Thursday night, indicating Huffington Post.

“My stomach turned when I saw this guy pushing his bike to serve Chinese food on his bicycle Mercedes,” he said. New York Times Johnny Miller, the photographer who filmed the scene. “Some of us have the privilege of not working during a disaster, some of us don’t.”

The American media paid him large sums to spread these images. The photographer announced that he would give the amount to the delivery person he was trying to identify.

“Don’t be a responsible person”

The scene has alerted the public on social networks, but officials are urging distribution companies and customers not to endanger the lives of these dangerous employees.

See also  Ford Ranger to get smaller sized sibling

In a message on Twitter, Alexandria Ocacio-Cordes, a Democrat-elected candidate in New York, responded harshly.

Don’t be the commanding person during the NWS’s flash flood [National Weather Services, le service de météo des Etats-Unis] It is considered a dangerous and life threatening situation. This puts vulnerable people at risk. If it’s too dangerous for you, it’s too dangerous for them, ”he said.

Former Manhattan lawyer Elisa Arlens and sports journalist David Aldridge have also appealed that the delivery should not endanger the lives of men, according to the American newspaper.

You can settle the grain in a bowl for dinner, ”David Aldridge replied.

The New York Times Delivery companies are accused of inciting delivery companies to admit mistakes with increasing premiums as needed. “For drivers, a night like this is profitable despite the risks to their health and safety.” New York Times.

Amazon stops distributions

Faced with this outcry, GrubHub denies any liability. A company spokesman said Business Insider She could not confirm that this delivery man was working for her.

“Priority to the safety of the delivery persons” protects the GroupHub spokesperson, and “no delivery person shall take any action that endangers their safety”.

However, CrabHub does not seem to be the only company sending risky workers to risk their lives to provide a customer. The Huffington Post Detected several social media posts. Despite NWS warnings, an UberEats delivery boy was found brought knee-deep in water or an Amazon truck on a flooded street.

On Twitter, the New York representative of the Amazon Employees’ Safety Association, Amazon United, condemned his management.

“New York residents have been receiving these emergency alerts since 7:30 pm, saying the situation is ‘life threatening’ and we should not travel unless they have to flee or get an eviction order. And what does Amazon do? Work for our 10 night shift.”

Contact Business Insider sites to find out if they plan to continue operating in this dangerous situation. UberEats did not respond. Amada Amazon has finally decided to stop its services after the hurricane Ida. “We will only resume operations when these sites are secure,” said a spokesman for the e-commerce group.

See also  Business change: Leaders need to evolve

You May Also Like

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *