Japan suspends use of three modern vaccines that may have been contaminated by contaminants

Japan suspends use of three modern vaccines that may have been contaminated by contaminants

The Japanese Ministry of Health announced on Saturday, August 28, that an investigation had been launched into the deaths of two men who received the Moderna vaccine against Kovit-19 from a panel that was suspended on Thursday. “The causal relationship of the vaccine is now unknown”, The Ministry states.

The inquest, announced Saturday, is about the deaths of two men, aged 30 and 38. Both received a second dose of the Moderna vaccine from suspended blocks in August. According to the Ministry of Health, they had no underlying health problems or a history of allergies and had the flu after the injection.

On Thursday, the country suspended the use of 1.63 million doses of the vaccine from three volumes, for fear of contaminating the product. Contaminants have been reported by “Many Vaccine Centers” In some of the unopened vials, Daketa, the company that imports the vaccine to Japan, explained.

More than 800 centers in Japan received doses from these blocks. According to the Japanese public television NHK, the problem was found in 39 sealed vials at eight vaccination centers. They all came from only one of the three places, and the other two were withdrawn as a precaution.

The US company, Moderna, announced on Thursday that it was investigating the announcement and was working with Dakota and Japanese authorities. “To date, there is no security or performance issue” Associated with these contaminants “Not recognized”, Then, without mentioning the nature of the foreign bodies found in these vials, he assured Modernna.

These modules are manufactured at the Moderna subcontractor factory in Spain, Rovi, which manufactures its vaccines for markets outside the United States. On Thursday, the Spanish Ministry of Health told AFP “Available data”, Three places involved “Not distributed in any other country” This problem is only worse than in Japan.

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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