What students say about us and our intelligence | Health | Magazine

What students say about us and our intelligence |  Health |  Magazine

Do the eyes really see the soul? Two scientists have discovered the relationship between students and our personality.

Thanks to various scientific studies today it can be confirmed Our eyes, especially our students, talk about our inner state. Our student reaction is an activity that can only be assessed through laboratory techniques. However, it also serves as a simple and reliable code for understanding our psychological processes.

The scientific interest in student research began already at the beginning of the last century. Since then, several investigations have been carried out Provides valuable information on various aspects of student activity.

The bigger the students, the more intelligent. They reflect on this Three studies Conducted by three scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology, they measured students’ cognitive ability in subjects based on rational, attention, and memory tests.

Being overly concerned with something or someone as a lasting student is often one of the most difficult symptoms to recognize. Photo: Shutterstock

“In fact, in all three studies, we found that the difference in student size between those who scored high and those who scored low on cognitive tests was large enough to be detected by the naked eye.” Jason S. Sukahara, Alexander b. Burcoin Randall W. Engle, Study authors, in Science American.

“For the first time, we discovered that there is this amazing relationship between students and intelligence, from the differences in the mental effort people use to complete memory tasks,” they continue. “We use student expansion as an indicator of effort, a technique that comes from a psychologist Daniel Conman In the 1960s and 1970s. When we first discovered the relationship between elementary student size and intelligence, we were not fully aware of whether it was real or what it meant. “

How smart are you in terms of your personality?

“We found that larger student levels were associated with higher fluid intelligence, better focus control, and greater ability to memorize to a lesser extent, resulting in A fascinating relationship between the brain and the human eye”, Scientists insist. “Interestingly, student size is related to the age of the participants: older ones are younger and more contracted.”

In addition, it has been proven, The more difficult a task for a person, the larger their student diameter. These results have been demonstrated with a variety of tasks: multiplication, spelling of words, mental calculation … In all cases, students provided an indicator of cognitive endeavor and the focus and involvement of the individual exerciser.

An important element, ‘Locus Corolius’

An experience that scares you creates emotions in “Locus Corolius”. Photo: News Science, Harvard University

“It simply came to our notice then locus coeruleus, A point on the surface of the brain has powerful neural connections to other parts of the brain”, They explain. “It releases the neurotransmitter hormone norepinephrine, which regulates such processes Perception, focus, memory or learning. It helps maintain a healthy system of cognitive functioning so that different parts of the brain can work together to accomplish challenging tasks and goals. “

Photo: Shutterstock / Kittel

Also, when locus coeruleus, Episodes related to Alzheimer’s disease or are more likely to suffer from symptoms or disorders such as inattention. “It simply came to our notice then Those with larger students organize the process better locus coeruleus, Which benefits cognitive performance and brain function at rest”Complete the researchers. Nevertheless, they acknowledge that “more research is needed to further explore this possibility and determine why older students are being linked to greater intelligence and control of attention.” (I)

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About the Author: Cary Douglas

Cary Douglas is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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