Australia: Slow down the disappearance of coral at all costs

La Grande barrière de corail australienne

According to Australian scientists, “glittering the clouds” and allowing the corals to withstand the heat are two techniques.

The site in Northeast Australia, which was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1981, is expected to “deteriorate rapidly” over the next fifty years due to climate change, according to a study published in the Royal Society’s Open Science magazine.

“Corals are one of the most climate-sensitive ecosystems,” lead writer Scott Conte told the AFP.

“According to sample projects, the proportion of corals within the Great Barrier Reef rock could drop to less than 10% in 20 years,” he said.

However, Condy, a senior researcher at the Australian National Institute of Science (CSIRO), said the decline could be mitigated by pursuing large-scale projects on a planetary basis.

The Great Barrier Reef has already experienced three episodes of bleaching in five years, while the first half since 1995 has disappeared due to rising water temperatures.

Candy and the other authors of this article were modeling the potential impact of the technique of creating “clouds bright” that tested the first major barrier last year.

It contains salt crystals that shine into clouds and they cool the water around the rocks.

They also designed control measures against a predatory starfish species that feed on corals and thrive through bleaching, which causes large fish to leave the area.

“By combining these measures, the results suggest that the fall of the Great Barrier Reef could be delayed by two decades or more,” he said. Candy said.

He confirmed that this was “urgent” and that the scientist needed “more important and enormous investments than ever before”.

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This model assumes that global temperatures will not rise above 1.8 degrees by 2100, forcing governments to meet their obligations under the Paris Climate Agreement.

(Source: AFP, General)

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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