Uber has 14 times refused to pay $ 1.1 million to blind American travelers

Uber has 14 times refused to pay $ 1.1 million to blind American travelers

There is an independent arbitrator The culprit was Uber on Thursday In 14 cases a driver was fined $ 1.1 million (approximately 6 936,000) for illegally discriminating against a blind passenger following his refusal to accept his fare. The arbitrator also rejected Uber’s argument that the company was not responsible for the discrimination used by its drivers because of its status as self – employed.

Uber has stated that it does not agree with this conclusion. Lisa Irving, who lives in the San Francisco Bay Area, who is blind, helps her guide dog Bernie get around, saying, “She complained against Uber in 2018 for refusing to ride or being harassed by Uber drivers. According to the referee, I would like to take her with a guide dog.

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Uber drivers left Lisa Irving late at night and made her come to work late (which eventually helped her get fired), in two cases, verbally assaulted and threatened – no discrimination ‘and did not stop after complaining to Uber. Prosecutors said in a statement to Insider.

“There is a position that all Americans who need to feel liberated by the ride-praising revolution, the blind and the blind, should get more. However, the record for large rights-sharing services is excellent and, at worst, apparently discriminatory,” says Catherine, one of Lisa Irving’s lawyers.

“A guide dog can go anywhere a blind person can go under Americans with disabilities (ADA, the American Civil Rights Act of 1990 prohibits discrimination against individuals),” says Catherine Caballo.

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“We are proud that Uber’s technology has helped the visually impaired to find and get rides.” Drivers using the Uber app are expected to serve riders with service animals and comply with access and other laws, and we provide driving training on this responsibility on a regular basis. Our dedicated team will review every complaint and take appropriate action, ”Uber spokesman Andrew Haspan told the Insider in a statement.

But the arbitrator found that the Uber staff investigating the potential incidents of discrimination were “trained” […] Teaching drivers to find non-discriminatory reasons for refusing rides “and” buying advocacy “for drivers to stay on stage despite discrimination complaints.

Uber tried to criticize its drivers

Americans with Disabilities It is illegal for legally regulated transportation companies to take people with guided dogs, but Uber has tried to blame its drivers, arguing that he is not responsible for ADA violations because his drivers are independent contractors.

The arbitral tribunal ruled that the ADA violations were largely due to “its contract supervision of its drivers and its inability to prevent discrimination by properly training its workers”.

However, classifying drivers as contractors is a tactic that has allowed Uber to avoid legal liability in other contexts, such as accusing a pedestrian of losing his leg after being hit by Uber.

The strategy is to avoid paying drivers’ health insurance, sick wages and unemployment insurance, and transfer those costs to taxpayers – who paid $ 80 million (approximately $ 68 million) last year. Creates among the largest recipients.

Uber, elevators and other ride-greeting and food delivery companies have been actively fighting attempts to reclassify drivers as employees in many states and countries, which would add significant additional costs to already unprofitable business models. Earlier this week, the share price of UK-based food delivery company Delivery fell 30%, after investors worried about it going public.

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Axel Springer, the parent company of Insider Inc., is an investor in Uber.

Original version: Tyler Sonmaker / Insider

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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