Cherokee tribe asks Jeep to change their 4×4 name

BFM Business

Cherokee has asked Native American carmaker Jeep to change the name of its popular 4×4 Cherokee.

The famous Jeep 4X4 Cherokee may have had to change its name in its 50s because the leader of the Native American tribe who named it believes the time has come for businesses and sports teams in the United States to stop using their name.

Chuck Hoskin Jr., head of the Cherokee tribe, told the group he did not tolerate the use of “Cherokee” by their business, “a spokesman for the tribe confirmed to AFP on Monday.

Call of the Cherokee Chief

He told Stellandis Group, the parent company of Jeep, about the merger between the French groups PSA and the Italian-American Fiat Chrysler via video conference on January 29. Contacting AFP, the automaker did not respond Monday afternoon.

“In this country, I think the time has come for companies and sports teams to remove Native American names, images and logos from their products, jerseys and teams,” the Cherokee president justified in a statement sent to the United States on January 14. Car and driver, Who has demanded it.

“It was well-intentioned, but did not respect us.”

“I hope it was well-intentioned, but writing our name on the side of a car does not give us respect,” he lamented.

Jeep introduced this 4×4 in 1974, and since then many models have been successful.

“The best way to respect us is to learn more about our government, our role in this country, our history, our culture and our language, and to engage in constructive dialogue with the federal government-recognized tribes in the culture of reservation,” said Chuck Hoskin Jr..

Under pressure, the Washington football team and the Cleveland baseball team recently dropped names borrowed from Native American tribes, the Redskins and Indians, respectively.

Jean Poland with AFP PFMTV Reporter

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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